The Church of St. Henry

Nousiainen, Finland

The first record of church in Nousiainen dates back to the year 1232. This refers to a smaller church dedicated to Our Lady which was probably built of wood. Nousiainen was a home of archdiocese in Finland from the early Middle Age and there have probably been several wooden churches before the present one. Archaeologists have found from the church area remains of graveyards dated back to the beginning of 11th century.

St. Henry, the legendary first bishop of Finland, was originally buried to the church of Nousiainen. His remains were moved to the Turku Cathedral in 1290s. Also the present stone church, built in 1420-1430, is dedicated to St. Henry. There's still a decorative sarcophagus in church of St. Henry, donated by the bishop Maunu Tawast in 1429.

The present church has been renovated at least in 1377, 1770, 1786, 1847, 1901, 1936 and 1967-1969. The National Board of Antiquities has named the church site as national built heritage.

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Details

Founded: 1420-1430
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

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User Reviews

Riitta Lindgren (4 months ago)
Vilho Peippo (5 months ago)
Hieno paikka
Mika Väliviita (5 months ago)
Licht Korn (9 months ago)
Gepflegter Ort der Ruhe. Schöne mittelalterliche Steinkirche.
Tero Niemi (12 months ago)
Hieno
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