The mediaeval greystone church is dedicated to St. Olav and was built in the 1450's. Long ago, Lemu was part of the great Nousiainen ancient parish, but parted to an independent administrative and ecclesiastical parish in the Middle Ages. When an episcopal church was erected in the old mother parish, a sanctuary consecrated to St. Olav was built also in Lemu.

First, a small wooden chapel was raised on Toijainen hill probably in the 13th century. An old crucifix and a baptismal font in the present church date back to those times. In the 14th century a small stone chapel was built and it now serves as the sacristy. In the 1430's an imposing mediaeval stone church was erected, partly by the wealth of the noblemen, partly by the toil of the peasants.

There are several curiosities in the church, such as - the only one of its kind in Finnish churches - the coat of arms of Mauno Särkilahti (Stjernkors), a painting of Martin Luther, an old Bible and a note of Marshal Mannerheim’s participation in confirmation. The years 1380, 1450 and 1959 are marked in the church banner. The altarpiece ”The Resurrection” by von Becker dates back to the year 1880.

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Details

Founded: 1460-1480
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

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3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Elina Soini (9 months ago)
Ossi Anttalainen (11 months ago)
Warm-hearted, beautiful stone church, atmospheric, soothing.
Ossi Anttalainen (15 months ago)
Spacious, clean, atmospheric, calm, beautiful, homely, soothing,
Heikki Karisto (15 months ago)
Pirjo Suominen (2 years ago)
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