Strossmayer Gallery of Old Masters

Zagreb, Croatia

The Strossmayer Gallery of Old Masters opened in November 1884, named after its founder, Josip Juraj Strossmayer, the bishop of Đakovo. The Strossmayer Gallery exhibits the works of European painters from 14th-19th century. The holdings have been classified into three major groups: Italian, French and Northern European (German, Flemish and Dutch) works, and also some works by Croatian artists. They were given the collective name of Schiavoni, deriving from the Italian name for Slavs. Although born on the eastern shore of the Adriatic, their lives and work were associated with Italy.

In addition to the paintings in the gallery, the Academy building also houses the Baška Tablet (Bašćanska ploča), the oldest known example of Glagolitic script, dating from 1102. A large statue of Bishop Strossmayer by Ivan Meštrović is located in the park behind the academy.

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Founded: 1884
Category: Museums in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Gordana (2 years ago)
As the building has historical significance. As the gallery is a place of culture. Often there are exhibitions that make exhibits.
Gordana (2 years ago)
As the building has historical significance. As the gallery is a place of culture. Often there are exhibitions that make exhibits.
Themis Demartino (2 years ago)
Themis Demartino (2 years ago)
JUZER KAPADIA (2 years ago)
In 1876 Josip Juraj Strossmayer, the rich and powerful Bishop of Ðakovo and one of the leading proponents of a pan-Slav movement, had this gallery built to house the Academy of Arts and Sciences and later the Gallery of Old Masters, to which he donated his own impressive collection of about 750 works of art. The Neo-Renaissance building has a large internal porticoed courtyard. Nine rooms on the upper floor house around a hundred works from the major European schools from the 14th to the 19th century. Behind the building is a large statue of Bishop Strossmayer sculpted by Ivan Meštrović in 1926.
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