Church of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Warsaw, Poland

The Church of the Visitation of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary, otherwise known as St. Mary's Church, is a church, is one of oldest buildings in Warsaw and one of the few surviving examples of Gothic architecture in the city.

St. Mary's Church stands on the site of an ancient pagan place of worship. The church's foundation stone was laid by Janusz I the Old, Duke of Masovia and his wife, Danutė of Lithuania, in 1409. The church was consecrated in 1411. It has been modified, demolished and rebuilt several times. Originally it had one nave, was made of bricks, had a ceiling and an arch presbytery, before the end of the 15th century it was transformed into a three nave basilica.

The church's most striking characteristic is the tower, built in 1518. It is recognizable from a great distance and is depicted in the oldest images of Warsaw.

During World War II, the church was severely damaged by German forces - the roof of the nave collapsed and the upper portion of the tower was blown up. It was reconstructed in 1947-1966 to the design by Beata Trylińska.

Behind the church is small park with a set of steps that lead down to the Vistula and the so named Kościuszko banks of the river. In the square there are outdoor theatre performances and concerts which are organized locally.

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Address

Przyrynek 2, Warsaw, Poland
See all sites in Warsaw

Details

Founded: 1409
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J.K. Jarchow (2 years ago)
We just saw the church from outside but very liked it due to its medieval and classic look.
Илья Валихов (2 years ago)
very majestic place
biji varughese (3 years ago)
Red brick chruch, beautiful from outside, plain inside and worth peek inside for pray..
Dr. Harsha vardhan reddy (5 years ago)
Beautiful place. Beautiful view.
Chris Lasa (6 years ago)
One of the most beautiful red brick churches I've seen!
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