Presidential Palace

Warsaw, Poland

The Presidential Palace is the elegant classicist latest version of a building that has stood on the Krakowskie Przedmieście site since 1643. Over the years, it has been rebuilt and remodeled many times. For its first 175 years, the palace was the private property of several aristocratic families. In 1791 it hosted the authors and advocates of the Constitution of May 3, 1791.

It was in 1818 that the palace began its ongoing career as a governmental structure, when it became the seat of the Viceroy of the Polish (Congress) Kingdom under Russian occupation. Following Poland's resurrection after World War I, in 1918, the building was taken over by the newly reconstituted Polish authorities and became the seat of the Council of Ministers. During World War II, it served the country's German occupiers as a Deutsches Haus and survived intact the 1944 Warsaw Uprising. After the war, it resumed its function as seat of the Polish Council of Ministers.

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Founded: 1643
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christine Wisniewska (4 months ago)
An impressive building on The New World Road (Novy Swiat). A lovely evening walk. Stop for coffee. Enjoy the atmosphere.
catarina patricio (4 months ago)
Very beautiful building. the soldiers at the door keep an eye on you if you linger but that's to be expected. It's a shame there are no tours...
Hristo Hristov (5 months ago)
Very beautiful place
Carmen Nash (5 months ago)
Fantastic tour guide to show me round the place today which I loved it so much
Vishalkumar Patel (6 months ago)
It's beautiful but I can't see by inside. I hope it is also beautiful inside also. because security reason no one can enter.
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The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

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