Czersk Castle Ruins

Czersk, Poland

The Castle of the Masovian Dukes in Czersk was built on the turning point of the fourteenth and fifteenth century by Prince Janusz I. When the Masovian land became part of the Kingdom of Poland - which was under the rule of Queen Bona Sforza. Primarily, the castle had three towers, one of them - being four-sided, was used as the main gate house.

During the war with the Swedes, in 1656, the castle became partly ruined. The retreating land army, close to Warta, under Stefan Czarniecki"s commandhad captured the stronghold and had devastated it. The castle went through a reconstruction between 1762-1766, when Marsza³ek Franciszek Bieliñski had commanded the reconstruction of the stronghold. However, due to the Prussian Partition, the Prussian leader had ordered for the demolition of the castle"s defense walls, reducing the stronghold"s military importance. From that time, nobody had every again took on the reconstruction of the castle. From the once mighty stronghold, all of the towers; a brick bridge from the eighteenth century; and the north and east wing of the castle had all survived.

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Address

Podzamcze 10, Czersk, Poland
See all sites in Czersk

Details

Founded: 1388-1410
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna (8 months ago)
A Castle of nearly a thousand years. The earliest land of the CISFRA nation was in the Polish. It's a very good history museum.
Joanna Usarek (10 months ago)
Really great place to visit, you are left alone to roam around those historical walls. Super cool. Highly recommend ?
Eric S (11 months ago)
Great place with an interesting story and even better views.
Wojciech Adamczyk (2 years ago)
Great place for a short trip outside of Warsaw. During your stay in the castle, you can enjoy traditional drinks, and homemade food. A great place for a small picnic.
Jorge Cano (2 years ago)
Ruins of a Castle from the XV century, one hour drive from Warsaw. Quite convenient for a morning trip during the weekend. The castle itself is nothing special as only some parts of the exterior wall are still standing as well as two towers. The view of the countryside from the top of the only tower that is accessible is maybe better than the castle itself.
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