Warsaw Royal Castle

Warsaw, Poland

The history of the Royal Castle goes back to the 14th century when the Great Tower was erected. In the 16th and 17th centuries during the reign of Sigismund III Vasa, the Castle underwent large-scale expansion and was transformed into a five-winged edifice with an inner courtyard. It was a royal residence, the place where parliamentary deliberations were held and the administrative and cultural centre of the country.

Destroyed in the mid-17th century during the Swedish Wars, it gradually regained its former magnificence during the reign of the Saxon-Wettin dynasty.

In the second half of the 18th century, artists in the employ of Stanislaus Augustus (Jan Christian Kamsetzer, Marcello Bacciarelli, Domenico Merlini) reconstructed the interiors of the chambers, comprising the Great Apartment and the King's Apartment.

During the period of the partitions of Poland (in the 19th century) the major part of the collections of the last Polish king ended up in Russia. After Poland regained its independence, some of the works of art were reinstated to their rightful place in the Castle.

In September 1939 the Castle was bombed by the Germans; however museologists, under the leadership of Professor Stanisław Lorentz, managed to salvage some elements of the interiors and also some of the works of art.

In September 1944 the Castle was blown up by the Germany army.

In the years 1945-1970, the Communist authorities delayed making a decision on whether to rebuild the Castle. The decision to do so was taken in 1971. Funds for the rebuilding of the Castle which took until 1980 were provided thanks to the dedication of the community.

In 1984 the reconstructed interiors were opened to the general public.

Since 1995 work has been undertaken on the conservation of the Kubicki Arcades and the reconstruction of the gardens. Once these works are completed, and the Tin-Roofed Palace refurbished, the rebuilding of the Royal Castle complex will have been finalized.

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Address

plac Zamkowy 4, Warsaw, Poland
See all sites in Warsaw

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

DHRUGEN BHATT (2 years ago)
Good historical place to visit it once. You will find local guides in and around the place. Depending on your interest you can take local city tour. Entire city of Warsaw has lot of history about WWII. Enjoy and Have a safe tour.
Muhammad Mahfuzur Rahman (2 years ago)
One of the must visit site of Warsaw. A reconstructed royal palace which was ruined by Nazi during the WW II. It is now a museum. It has spectacular collections of beautiful paintings, mostly from royal collections. These include two original oil colours of master painter Rembrandt, and many landscapes of famous Italian painter Bernardo Canaletto.
Cristina Maria (2 years ago)
A bit on the expensive side but very nice overall if you like art and paintings. The castle is beautifully kept and very easy to get to since it's in the centre of the Old Town. Parking spaces are nearby and it's surrounded by nice coffee shops and restaurants. The coffee shop that's right next to the ticket booth is great too. Would definitely recommend if you're in Warsaw.
Aaron Lemke (2 years ago)
Definitely visit if you're in the area! The history is stomach churning, but very educational. They have multi lingual tours.
Azra Ćulov (2 years ago)
I would recommend everyone booking a tour to this castle. The tour is quite long for a castle, the workers there are nice and they all speak English pretty well. You can leave your stuff for free at the cloak room. But most important of all, it is very beautiful and you will learn some new things about the history of Warsaw.
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