Palace of Culture and Science

Warsaw, Poland

The Palace of Culture and Science is the tallest building in Poland and the eighth tallest building in the European Union. It is 231 metres tall, which includes a 43-metre high spire.

The building was originally known as the Joseph Stalin Palace of Culture and Science, but in the wake of destalinization the dedication to Stalin was revoked. The building was conceived as a 'gift from the Soviet people to the Polish nation', and was completed in 1955. The structure was built in three years according to the design of the Soviet architect Lev Rudnev. Architecturally, it is a mix of Stalinist architecture, also known as Socialist Classicism, and Polish historicism inspired by American art deco skyscrapers. Currently it is the headquarters of many companies and public institutions, such as cinemas, theaters, libraries, sports clubs, universities, scientific institutions and authorities of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

The tower was constructed, using Soviet plans, almost entirely by 3500 workers from the Soviet Union, of whom 16 died in accidents during the construction.

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Address

plac Defilad 1, Warsaw, Poland
See all sites in Warsaw

Details

Founded: 1952-1955
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mildred Mugauri (17 months ago)
The view from the top is breathtaking. Right now it tends to be extremely cold so cover up when u go up. It was quite quick as well, i did not wait up for long, AND they have a special fee for students. I could see almost all of Warsaw's landmarks from above it is really beautiful.
Krisztian Cseh (18 months ago)
Cool place, it is defenetly worth the visit if in Warsaw. Climb up to the top, to enjoy an amazing view over the city. Secret tip: go at night ;)
Vladimir Bogosavljevic (18 months ago)
Perfect example of Soviet architecture, landmark unmissable in Warsaw. Used to be visible from half of Poland still standing tall in the middle of Polish capital. Astonishing view on complete Warsaw for couple of euros, don't miss it any time you visit this city. Also, modern skyscrapers look completely different from the ground level and from this bird perspective.
Jahnabi Basumatary (18 months ago)
Interesting for kids especially. A lot to learn about the culture of Poland, especially in the communism era. The view from the top is quite spectacular. For Poland, Warsaw is a happening place to be in. I would definitely recommend a visit for everyone.
Oskar Wilkon (18 months ago)
The palace itself is very beautiful and impressing, but I have to say that it didn't feel worth the wait or the money to go to the top of the building. The reason for my high rating is that there are a couple of very cool and interesting museums in the building. I definately recommend to check them out.
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