Götene Church

Götene, Sweden

The oak beams for the roof of Götene church were cut down around year 1125. Perhaps they were used for an older wood church. The choir of the church was consecrated in August 1, 1140.

The baptismal font is from the first half of the 12th century. In the middle of the 15th century the flat ceiling was replaced by vaults and some years later the Götene workshop (Götene Master) painted the choir with scenes from the creation and the Last Days of Christ. The vaults and parts of the east wall were never covered with lime wash. The main colours are brown, green, white and blue-grey. The covered paintings were uncovered and rather hard restored in 1909.

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Details

Founded: 1140
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.formonline.se

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roy Larsson (6 months ago)
Nice and cozy little church.❤️
Kristina Synnergård (2 years ago)
Very nice church and nice cemetery
Susanne Starzmann (3 years ago)
Beautiful, really worth a visit ???
Marie Isfåle (3 years ago)
Unfortunately bad grade as I experience poor treatment in contact with the cemetery administration, everything takes an eternity long time and I have had to call countless times and will have to call again to get my case done! Promises a lot but nothing happens !! Think it is a bad attitude towards someone who mourns!
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