Götene Church

Götene, Sweden

The oak beams for the roof of Götene church were cut down around year 1125. Perhaps they were used for an older wood church. The choir of the church was consecrated in August 1, 1140.

The baptismal font is from the first half of the 12th century. In the middle of the 15th century the flat ceiling was replaced by vaults and some years later the Götene workshop (Götene Master) painted the choir with scenes from the creation and the Last Days of Christ. The vaults and parts of the east wall were never covered with lime wash. The main colours are brown, green, white and blue-grey. The covered paintings were uncovered and rather hard restored in 1909.

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Details

Founded: 1140
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.formonline.se

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mats Johansson (46 days ago)
Gammal och fin, väl underhållen.
Ro x (47 days ago)
Trevligt ställe
Greenfang (4 months ago)
Det är en trevlig liten kyrka med välskötta gravar
Claes-Göran Ekström (2 years ago)
Svenson 91 (3 years ago)
Ne kleine nette Kirche.
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