Kyminlinna fortress was part of the South-Eastern Finland fortification system built by Russia after Russo-Swedish War of 1788-1790. Kyminlinna and Ruotsinsalmi sea fortress formed together a defense line, which was planned to stop enemies attacking from the west. First fortress was a bastion constructed in 1791-1795 by the general Aleksandr Suvorov. The older part was replaced only couple of years later by the much bigger five-corner caponier fortress (built in 1803-1808). When Russia occupied Finland in the Finnish war, Kyminlinna lost its defensive status. Only real battle in Kyminlinna was fought in the Finland civil war (9.4.1918) between German forces and red guards.

Nowadays the fortress area is owned by the Finnish government and it's open for public.

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Hyväntuulentie, Kotka, Finland
See all sites in Kotka

Details

Founded: 1791-1808
Category: Castles and fortifications in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Timo Keveri (7 months ago)
Ulkoapäin katsottuna vähän sanomattoman näköinen vanha linnoitus, pitäisi mennä katsomaan paremmin ja päästä sisäpuolelle. Edellisestä kerrasta on päälle 30 vuotta kun tuli oltua tämän linnan muurien sisällä.
Juha Viljanen (7 months ago)
Ainutlaatuinen linnoitus kaipaa aktiivista toimintaa. Kyminlinna on Kotkan hiomaton timantti odottamassa löytäjäänsä. Missä tahansa muualla maailmassa paikka olisi aktiivisessa käytössä, vaan ei meillä. Kotkansaari keskeisyys rajoittaa paikallisten toimintaa liikaa. Ehkäpä tarvitaan ulkopuolinen ihminen näkemään Kyminlinnan mahdollisuudet ja paikan keskeinen sijainti moottoritien varrella.
Soile Virkkilä (9 months ago)
Hieno linnoitus, mutta sisäpuolelle ei pääse kuin pari kertaa vuodessa
Jaska Vaste (2 years ago)
Very nice historic place. Finnish people like remember war with russians. "Winter war"
Renata Cristina (2 years ago)
The wall of a castles if you kotka good place to visite.
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