Callendar House is a mansion set within the grounds of Callendar Park in Falkirk. During the 19th century, it was redesigned and extended in the style of a French Renaissance château fused with elements of Scottish baronial architecture. However, the core of the building is a 14th-century tower house.

The house lies on the line of the 2nd-century Antonine Wall, built by the Romans from the Firth of Clyde to the Firth of Forth. In the 12th century Thanes Hall or Thane House, located to the east of the present house, was one of the seats of the Callander family who were Thanes of Callander. In the fourteenth century the 5th Thane Sir Patrick Callander, supported the claim of Edward Balliol to the throne of Scotland. Sir Patrick Callander was later attainted and his estates were forfeited.

During its 600-year history, Callendar House has played host to many prominent historical figures, including Mary, Queen of Scots, Oliver Cromwell, Bonnie Prince Charlie and Queen Victoria. The current building is by far the most substantial historical building in the area, with a 91 m frontage. It is protected as a category A listed building, and the grounds are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland.

The House's permanent displays are The Story of Callendar House, a history covering the 11th to the 19th centuries, The Antonine Wall, Rome's Northern Frontier, and Falkirk: Crucible of Revolution 1750-1850, tells how the local area was transformed during the first century of the industrial era.

In the restored 1825 Kitchen, costumed interpreters create an exciting interactive experience with samples of early-19th century food providing added taste to stories of working life in a large household.

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Founded: 1877
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruth Alexander (17 months ago)
Grounds are open every day. House itself only opened recently. Book house visit online. Lots to see in the house, we spent a good 2 hrs browsing through this large house with its many exhibits. Cafe still closed, however there is a small gift shop open and toilets.
Cory Randall (17 months ago)
The house wasn't busy when we went, although the park was popular with families and dog walkers. It includes play areas. The house is stunning and contains a very interesting museum.
Alison McAndrew Jones (17 months ago)
Beautiful park with lots of wildlife. Callendar House is very interesting and definitely worth a visit. The cafe serves delicious cakes and I would recommend their afternoon tea.
Imogen Morland (2 years ago)
We love coming here, food as good as it always is! First time we've come since COVID, everything was very safe and well organised.
Maggie Coleman (2 years ago)
Walks with friends around beautiful park then into the house for lunch. Highly recommended folks.
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