Castle Semple Collegiate Church

Lochwinnoch, United Kingdom

late Gothic Castle Semple Collegiate Church is under the protection of Historic Environment Scotland as a Scheduled monument.

John Sempill, 1st Lord Sempill founded the collegiate church near Castle Semple, in circa 1504. It had a provost, six chaplains or prebendaries, two boys, and a sacristan. The roof was removed in the 1800s, and the ivy has penetrated into the interior. The building is a simple oblong, terminating toward the east in a three-sided apse, and having a square tower projecting from the centre of the west wall. The forms of the double windows indicate that they are very late survivals of Gothic architecture. The other windows in the side walls are altered, but they do not present any features like those of the apse.

Over the door to the chancel are two coats of arms with the letters R. L. S. and A. M. S., one shield bearing the Sempill arms and the other those of Montgomerie. The square tower at the west end is extremely simple. The tower and most of the side walls are of about the date of the original foundation, while the east apse has been added in the 16th century, to receive the monument of John, Lord Sempill, who died at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. A few remains of the original squareheaded windows in the side walls are still traceable. The interior was divided by two solid walls into three compartments, so as to form separate private burial places. In the eastern compartment, there is a large monument to Lord Sempill. A monumental slab in the central compartment is erected in memory of Gabriel Sempel, who died in 1587.

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Founded: 1504
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Kingsbury (21 days ago)
It is great.
Murray Beattie (2 months ago)
Nice walk and interesting setting.
John Young (4 months ago)
Very pleasant walk along an old railway, visited the ruins of an old gothic church and walked back alongside the Loch. Great day out.
Jack Winch (8 months ago)
Worth the walk to see this 16th century church which James IV visited...
Gordon Denton (11 months ago)
Nice area and some lovely warks
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