Dom Luís I Bridge

Porto, Portugal

The Dom Luís I Bridge is a double-deck metal arch bridge that spans the River Douro between the cities of Porto and Vila Nova de Gaia in Portugal. At its construction, its 172 metres span was the longest of its type in the world.

Construction took place between 1881 and 1886 with the bridge being built adjacent to an existing bridge which it replaced. The granite pillars of the original bridge are still in place, standing on the Ribeira like a pair of gate posts.

One of the notable features of the Ponte Dom Luís I is it's two levels; one on top of the arch and the other suspended below it. Both decks were initially intended to carry road traffic but these days the top carries the Porto Metro trains as well as having a pedestrian walkway. It is worth making the crossing on the upper level.

Today Luis I Bridge is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Historic Centre of Oporto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar.

Comments

Your name



Address

ponte Luiz I, Porto, Portugal
See all sites in Porto

Details

Founded: 1881-1886
Category:

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mao Chu (2 years ago)
The view of the bridge it self is stunning, but if you stand up on the top of the bridge, it gives a whole different feeling! We didn’t have chance to take the cable car to the top, but we took another way, where you can walk up from the train station to the bridge. The way is easy to walk, especially with the sun shining it’s actually quite comfortable to walk. To walk on the bridgeC it takes around 15-25 minutes plus photo shooting time (at least for me
Lucy Oliveira (2 years ago)
Appreciated the panoramic views walking across the top of the bridge which is only open to the Metro train and people walking along the sidewalk. One can descend down towards the shoreline via a side road and walk back along the lower level of the bridge. Best part of this is that it doesn't cost you any money unless you decide to stop for lunch along the way.
Nicky Jurd (2 years ago)
A magnificent landmark worthy of close inspection. We walked across the bridge both day and night and marvelled at the construction and design of the bridge. Crossing from above or below will give you a completely different perspective of the Douro River. On the southern side of the bridge is the best spot for photos but is often crowded with people taking selfies.
Bonita Liang (2 years ago)
Icon of Porto! The view is amazing day and night. Top bridge is quite a climb but it's a relaxing walk once you are there. The bottom bridge seems to be busier but it adds to the fun. Try both if you have a chance.
Douglas Kelly (2 years ago)
Walk over the small bridge to more historic shops and restaurants. There are great views. If you are there on a busy day you might feel like crossing the bridge is a sporting event. Between cars, narrow pedestrian walks and lots of activity, watch your step. Fun to walk and explore. Great pictures at sunset
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.