Clérigos Church

Porto, Portugal

The Clérigos Church ('Church of the Clergymen') is a Baroque church in Porto. Its tall bell tower, the Torre dos Clérigos, can be seen from various points of the city and is one of its most characteristic symbols.

The church was built for the Brotherhood of the Clérigos (Clergy) by Nicolau Nasoni, an Italian architect and painter who left an extense work in the north of Portugal during the 18th century.

Construction of the church began in 1732 and was finished around 1750, while the monumental divided stairway in front of the church was completed in the 1750s. The main façade of the church is heavily decorated with baroque motifs (such as garlands and shells) and an indented broken pediment. This was based on an early 17th-century Roman scheme. The central frieze above the windows present symbols of worship and an incense boat. The lateral façades reveal the almost elliptic floorplan of the church nave.

The Clérigos Church was one of the first baroque churches in Portugal to adopt a typical baroque elliptic floorplan. The altarpiece of the main chapel, made of polychromed marble, was executed by Manuel dos Santos Porto.

The monumental tower of the church, located at the back of the building, was only built between 1754 and 1763. The baroque decoration here also shows influence from the Roman Baroque, while the whole design was inspired by Tuscan campaniles. The tower is 75.6 metres high, dominating the city. There are 240 steps to be climbed to reach the top of its six floors. This great structure has become the symbol of the city.

In Porto, Nicolau Nasoni was also responsible for the construction of the Misericórida Church, the Archbishop's Palace and the lateral loggia of Porto Cathedral. He entered the Clérigos Brotherhood and was buried, at his request, in the crypt of the Clérigos Church, with the exact place remaining unknown.

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Details

Founded: 1732-1750
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Lash (17 months ago)
Surprisingly beautiful Church. The clock tower climb requires you to be comfortable in tight spaces, and passing people on small steep stone stairways, but the view is worth the trip to the top.
Martin Laššák (17 months ago)
In my view a good starting point to start exploring the city. Wonderful views from the tower. Interesting things to see in the church.
Marco Guedes (17 months ago)
The church is very beautiful and you can freely walk around and even go to higher floors, so you can see the church from an upper view. The Tower had no queue when I went there and it's entrance covers a little museum further than the tower. When going up it was a bit narrow for me, so when other tourists were going down (it's the same way) we had to stick to the wall, but wasn't any troublesome...the great view from there makes it all worth!
Monica Sabourin (18 months ago)
Such a stunning building. Definitely worth the visit in and the walk up to the top. Great views of Porto. Gets busy, so be prepared to wait awhile. Also. Quite small stairways - so if you're claustrophobic, maybe give this one a miss.
vivian Teh (19 months ago)
Is so pretty when you go all the way to the top of the tower, you can see the whole Porto. Absolutely stunning. I am so lucky to witness a couple who gets marry on that day. Really cool
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