Christinehof Castle

Brösarp, Sweden

Christinehof Castle was built between 1737 and 1740 in the German Baroque style. It was a residence of countess Christina Piper, who had acquired the near Andrarums ironworks couple of years earlier.

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Details

Founded: 1737-1740
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Liisa Uusimaki (4 months ago)
Beautiful castle unfortunately closed
TheFpsNinja (4 months ago)
Excellent story telling about history especially with kids as they cosplay "Christinehof" and tell it like acting as her with a lot of detail! A true memory for life!
Andreas Borsiin (9 months ago)
Lovely to take a walk in the park
Laura Sapalaite (22 months ago)
Christinehof Slott fantastic place from spring to autumn. I love that place i went there with friend by walking around. You have to visit that place, so much power and energy in that place. There is parking place too and history about women Christine ant her life in that house.
M. P. (2 years ago)
A beautiful ecopark around this castle. Very nice hiking routes in this area. Good for a dog walk and a hike with the whole family. Even small kids can walk routes. A large parking right in front of the castle. Easy to find. The last few meters are gravel.
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