The written history of Laukko manor dates back to year 1416, but according the folklore the local chieftain Matti Kurki received it as a manor from the king of Sweden in the 13th century. The most famous of the medieval lords of Laukko was Klaus Kurki, the tragic hero of a ballad called The Death of Elina. In real life Klaus’s son Arvid became the last Bishop of Catholic Finland. At around the beginning of the 16th century the Kurcks had a stone castle built at Laukko as a symbol of their might and prosperity. The Kurki family owned Laukko until 1817. After that it has been owned by several families, for example famous industrialists Adolf Törngren and Rafael Haarla. Nowadays Laukko is a residence of the Lagerstam family.

The present neo-classic manor house was built in the 1930s. The estate reopened to the public in the summer of 2016, as the estate celebrates its 600th anniversary. For the first time, visitors can see the estate in its entire splendor. The visitors can now admire the main building’s unique collections of arts and antiquities and stroll in the estate’s vast gardens and grounds.

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Details

Founded: 1416
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

www.laukonkartano.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josefina Jokiniemi (3 years ago)
Great natural surroundings. Delicious meals.
Josefina Jokiniemi (3 years ago)
Great natural surroundings. Delicious meals.
Arvo Parra (3 years ago)
Super.
Petri Juurinen (4 years ago)
Elias Lönnrot wrote Kalevala here. Amazing landscape and lovely food. No reason to avoid.
Petri Juurinen (4 years ago)
Elias Lönnrot wrote Kalevala here. Amazing landscape and lovely food. No reason to avoid.
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