The Lenin museum is located at the old Worker's Hall of Tampere, where V. I. Lenin and Josef Stalin met for the first time in 1905. It was opened in 1946 to present the life and ideas of Lenin. Today the museum focuses more widely to material related to Lenin's life and activities and the history of the Soviet Union.

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Details

Founded: 1946
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Herbst (12 months ago)
Small but interesting museum where you can learn a lot about how the Soviet Union was formed. Take a photo with Stalin and Lenin. The staff was really friendly.
Robert Ramberg (14 months ago)
A great museum to experience the Soviet era in Russia, not forgetting the Putin times...
Infoexpert X (15 months ago)
An absolutely brilliant combination of audiovisual works computers and exhibits. Everything in three languages Finnish Russian and English. Starts with Lenin but goes through the whole history of the Soviet Union. This is a great museum on Lenin but more than that the 2016 redo would be brilliant for any musuem what ever the topic. The military museum in Helsinki could learn a lot from this place as they rejig there collection.
Ruud Wijffelaars (21 months ago)
The Lenin museum is fun to visit if you don't have anything to do for an hour or so. The place offers some insight in the relations between Finland and the USSR mostly in the time when Lenin was active. Don't expect to be here for hours though. It is just one floor.
Mrs Suvi (21 months ago)
The Lenin museum was a hit with our party! We happened to show up just as the Finnish guide was starting his tour. The guide was very informative and thorough, we enjoyed his account on the museum and history very much. The museum is small but very nicely put up and filled with memorabilia of the Soviet Union. One of my top picks for Tampere!
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