Tampere Art Museum

Tampere, Finland

The Tampere Art Museum was established in 1931. It was founded by the Tampere Art Society which had already been collecting art and arranging art exhibitions in Tampere since the beginning of the last century.

The museum is renowned for its active exhibition policy, especially exhibitions presenting ancient cultures, wide-ranging publication activities, the Young Artist of the Year event and Moominvalley, which can be found in the city main library "Metso". The Tampere Art Museum presents important themes from art history and phenomena of contemporary art in both its Finnish and international exhibitions. The museum's collections consist mainly of domestic art from the early 19th century onwards.

Since its establishment the museum has been situated in a granary designed by C.L. Engel and completed in 1838 in the area of Amuri.

Reference: The City of Tampere

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Details

Founded: 1838 (Art Museum 1931)
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jazz Chou (7 months ago)
Very well designed museum with valuable original sketches and original hand-made model sets by Tove Jansson. Very detailed description of all the works with tablet, app, guide book and audio description available. A studio where different workshops were held (DIY Christmas decorations when we're there). Lots of fun! Easily spent 2 hours just going through all the items. And the shop with many must-buys, museum-exclusive souvenirs. No pictures allowed mostly so have to be there to see for yourself!
Alex Klyce (12 months ago)
The only Moomin Museum in the world is certainly worth going to for any fans of the Moomins. While it is a very fun experience for all ages, you should know that it is less about the Moomins themselves and more about Tove Jansson. In the two-floored museum you will find many tableaus created by Tove's aquaintances that show scenes from the books. There is a section for every book published by Tove and each tableau has an easy to use tablet set up next to it to tell you about. There is a huge model of Moominhouse that depicts it the way Tove envisioned it that makes the whole museum a must see in its self! You can even "walk around it" in a 3D model on one of the tablets. Also, there is an art studio next to the A Dangerous Journey section where you can, for free, paint in goulache watercolors on a blank piece of watercolor paper or on a book cover template to create your own Moomin cover art. It is great fun! Finally, you will find a reading room to the left (facing towards the museum) of the exhibition with the Moomin books in many different languages as well as the exclusive What Happens Next? book about the exhibition you can only buy there. The gift shop is also very good and for those that collect the mugs you may find one in it from only last year that you missed and can buy in the shop.
Jarmo Skön (13 months ago)
Amazing For all ages!
Mikko Leikkari (14 months ago)
If you like art :)
Michely Libos (14 months ago)
Lovely place... The exhibition is awesome! Anita Snellmanin!
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