St. Hyacinth's Church

Vyborg, Russia

St. Hyacinth's Church is a Gothic building, formerly a church, in Vyborg. It was built in the 16th century as a private church for members of the nobility, and became a Roman Catholic church dedicated to Saint Hyacinth in 1802. In 1970 the neglected and disused building was restored for use as a children's art school. It is now an art gallery. The wrought iron railings here once belonged to Cathedral of the Transfiguration, Vyborg.

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Address

A127, Vyborg, Russia
See all sites in Vyborg

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

OLIVA GRA (2 years ago)
Красивый интерьер для фотографий. Доброжелательный работник.
Алексей Курбатов (2 years ago)
Красивое здание с богатой историей. Раньше здесь располагалась художественная школа. Сейчас доступ закрыт. Рядом погулять можно. Тихая, уютная улочка.
сергей ку (3 years ago)
очень необычная архитектура для костела.... скорее уж жилой дом дворянина...
Andrey Tsvelikhovskiy (4 years ago)
Бывшая художественная школа, где учился рисовать мой брат
Gregory Pozhvanov (4 years ago)
Интересное старинное здание, частично сохранившийся интерьер с лестницей, камином в зале рыцарского собрания. Если удастся попасть, когда будете в Выборге – стоит воспользоваться возможностью и осмотреть дом.
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