Trongzund Fort

Vysotsk, Russia

The fortress of Trongzund (or Trångsund, lit. narrow strait) was built by the order of Peter the Great in the beginning of the 18th century after the Tsardom of Russia had captured the area from Sweden during the Great Northern War. In 1812, Trongzund was included by Alexander I into the newly created Grand Duchy of Finland.

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Address

Pionerskaya 2, Vysotsk, Russia
See all sites in Vysotsk

Details

Founded: c. 1710
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Александра Баскакова (9 months ago)
Волшебное место, прекрасная природа, тишина, простор и чистый воздух. От крепости остались руины. Приезжали с детьми, им тоже очень понравилось. Можно устроить пикник на свежем воздухе. К нам в гости пришли котики, а под ногами росли грибы. Впечатления и память на всю жизнь!
Aleksei Gnetnev (11 months ago)
Это место для тех кто уже побывал в других, более известных местах. Дорога до крепости не близкая. Никаких особых указателей нет. Интересный ландшафт. Выступающие наружу гранитные лбы. Сама крепость выдолблена в них же. Со стороны её достаточно трудно заметить. То там, то тут неожиданно натыкаешься на карпичную кладку, а через несколько шагов она снова прячется под покрывалом кустов и травы. Маяк в форме паганки тоже довольно колоритный.
Дмитрий Иванов (13 months ago)
Красиво, живописно. Под толщей культурного слоя скрываются старинная, середины позапрошлого века крепость. Созданные, как все исконно русское, надежно, на века, береговые укрепления, почти не разграблены. Входы в лабиринты бастионов запечатаны либо каменной кладкой, либо решеткой. А поверх гранитных стен вырос лес. Рыбачат на остатках причала рыбаки. Прямо между бастионами, готовят шашлык отдыхающие. Тайны руин, видимо, останутся тайнами... навсегда...
SUPER SPIRITS (15 months ago)
Very interesting! Well, yes, an amateur, but it's like all the sights. But the amateur will not regret! The preservation is good, only it is overgrown. It is worthwhile climbing everywhere, as some dungeons and structures are not so easy to find, but I did not find a map.
Martti Sgurev (2 years ago)
Old fortress with long tunnels
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