Trongzund Fort

Vysotsk, Russia

The fortress of Trongzund (or Trångsund, lit. narrow strait) was built by the order of Peter the Great in the beginning of the 18th century after the Tsardom of Russia had captured the area from Sweden during the Great Northern War. In 1812, Trongzund was included by Alexander I into the newly created Grand Duchy of Finland.

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Address

Pionerskaya 2, Vysotsk, Russia
See all sites in Vysotsk

Details

Founded: c. 1710
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexander Shestakov (11 months ago)
There is no museum. All structures are heavily ruined. There are a couple of lighthouses. There are signs and a diagram of the structures. Interesting, but I would like more information. The landscapes are beautiful. Vyborg is visible on a clear day
Елизавета Балыбердина (14 months ago)
An unusual, unique place: from here you can see the entrance to the port of Vyborg, over one of the capes even Olaf's tower rises, the views of gentle rocks peeping out of the water and pines growing on them reminds Finland, and due to the low accessibility, that is, the remoteness from St. Petersburg, the fortress is not dirty and not very ruined. You can get inside, equipped with flashlights, or climb up the grassy slope. The most convenient way to get to Trongsund is on your own, by car: along the old Vyborg highway or along the Primorskoye highway. The train takes longer and more dreary: either directly to Popovo is almost four hours, or first to Vyborg by "swallow" and from there by local train to Popovo, plus and another 12.5 km from Popovo to Vysotsk (on foot or by hitchhiking).
Bair Irincheev (17 months ago)
A great fortification from the 19th century but in a decaying condition. Some underground galleries are dangerous due to bricks falling from the ceiling vaults.
Александра Баскакова (4 years ago)
Волшебное место, прекрасная природа, тишина, простор и чистый воздух. От крепости остались руины. Приезжали с детьми, им тоже очень понравилось. Можно устроить пикник на свежем воздухе. К нам в гости пришли котики, а под ногами росли грибы. Впечатления и память на всю жизнь!
Aleksei Gnetnev (4 years ago)
Это место для тех кто уже побывал в других, более известных местах. Дорога до крепости не близкая. Никаких особых указателей нет. Интересный ландшафт. Выступающие наружу гранитные лбы. Сама крепость выдолблена в них же. Со стороны её достаточно трудно заметить. То там, то тут неожиданно натыкаешься на карпичную кладку, а через несколько шагов она снова прячется под покрывалом кустов и травы. Маяк в форме паганки тоже довольно колоритный.
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