Mon Repos or 'Monrepos' is a manor house and landscaped English park in Vyborg. Between 1788, when Ludwig Heinrich von Nicolai bought it, and 1943, 'Monrepos' was owned by the family of Baron Nicolai (better Nicolay). The historic core of the museum complex is a manor from the early 19th century. This consists of the Main house and the Library house, monuments of wooden classical architecture, and the landscape rock park designed in the romantic style, and which remains a unique monument of gardening art. Among the park designers were such architects as J. Martinelli, Auguste de Montferrand, A. Shtakenshneider, Ch. Tetam, artists Ya. Mattenleiter, and P. Gonzago. The area of the park is marked by special physical and geographical features, like the old Wiborgite granite, which is named after Vyborg, and glacial formations of up to 20 metres high. In this nature reserve, 50 species of different plants can be found, some of them being rare. Its fauna is diverse as well: the park abounds in numerous birds and animals.

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Details

Founded: 1788
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Knapp (20 months ago)
Very beautiful and serene ...
Nadya Mi (2 years ago)
The most beautiful place to explore. I enjoyed the scenic walks a lot even though big part of the park was closed when I visited.
Denis Muravlyansky (2 years ago)
Very interesting pkace eith lot of sightseens
Nick Lapitsky (2 years ago)
Great park, but right now there is a lot of renovations going on. Still makes sense to visit the wilder parts along the bay.
A. Berndt (2 years ago)
It used to be a great place, but at the moment half of the territory is a big building site. And they charge you an entry fee for that.
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