Raatitorni (The Council Tower) is the only remaining part of the medieval Vyborg city walls. After the wall was demolished it functioned as a bell tower of near church. The tower was damaged in Winter War, but restored later.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

A127, Vyborg, Russia
See all sites in Vyborg

Details

Founded: 1470s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dmitry Shutko (2 years ago)
Красиво, умели же строить!
Станислав Сидоренко (3 years ago)
Прекрасный и разрушающийся на глазах город Выборг наконец-то стали немного восстанавливать. Один из объектов реставрация - это башня ратуши названная так, потому что во время осады города ее должны были оборонять члены городской ратуши) После реставрации конечно преобразилась полностью
Александр Калашников (3 years ago)
Это Выборг, это очень стильно и красиво.
Павел Тимонов (3 years ago)
прекрасный ветшающий на глазах туристический город. Спешите его посетить, пока он полностью не развалился. Старый город атмосферен и прекрасен, несмотря на то, что за ним крайне плохо ухаживают. Крепостная улица-главная- треть состоит из фасадов уже нежилых зданий. Старинные дома-если сгорают- не реставрируются. Но атмосфера шведско-финнской древности с элементами советского убожества пока впечатляет раз и навсегда.
Филипп Перепелица (3 years ago)
Башня построена в 1470-х годах вместе с прочими башнями оборонительной стены каменного города. Всего башен было девять, две из которых сохранились. В XVII веке башню стали использовать в качестве колокольни собора доминиканского монастыря (после Реформации — церкви Выборгского сельского прихода). Новое назначение постройки стало причиной последующих переделок, исказивших её первоначальный облик. Оригинальный деревянный шпиль башни был уничтожен в последний день советско-финской войны 1939−1940 г., 13 марта 1940 года. Много лет здание стояло пустым и без кровли. В 1952 году в башне начались первые ремонтно-восстановительные работы. С 1997 года башня передана в аренду общине церкви Божьей Матери Державной и приспособлена под церковный музей.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kraków Cloth Hall

The Cloth Hall in Kraków dates to the Renaissance and is one of the city's most recognizable icons. It is the central feature of the main market square in the Kraków Old Town (listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1978).

The hall was once a major centre of international trade. Traveling merchants met there to discuss business and to barter. During its golden age in the 15th century, the hall was the source of a variety of exotic imports from the east – spices, silk, leather and wax – while Kraków itself exported textiles, lead, and salt from the Wieliczka Salt Mine.

Kraków was Poland's capital city and was among the largest cities in Europe already from before the time of the Renaissance. However, its decline started with the move of the capital to Warsaw in the very end of the 16th century. The city's decline was hastened by wars and politics leading to the Partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century. By the time of the architectural restoration proposed for the cloth hall in 1870 under Austrian rule, much of the historic city center was decrepit. A change in political and economic fortunes for the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria ushered in a revival due to newly established Legislative Assembly or Sejm of the Land. The successful renovation of the Cloth Hall, based on design by Tomasz Pryliński and supervised by Mayor Mikołaj Zyblikiewicz, Sejm Marshal, was one of the most notable achievements of this period.

The hall has hosted many distinguished guests over the centuries and is still used to entertain monarchs and dignitaries, such as Charles, Prince of Wales and Emperor Akihito of Japan, who was welcomed here in 2002. In the past, balls were held here, most notably after Prince Józef Poniatowski had briefly liberated the city from the Austrians in 1809. Aside from its history and cultural value, the hall still is still used as a center of commerce.

On the upper floor of the hall is the Sukiennice Museum division of the National Museum, Kraków. It holds the largest permanent exhibit of the 19th-century Polish painting and sculpture, in four grand exhibition halls arranged by historical period and the theme extending into an entire artistic epoch. The museum was upgraded in 2010 with new technical equipment, storerooms, service spaces as well as improved thematic layout for the display.

The Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art was a major cultural venue from the moment it opened on October 7, 1879. It features late Baroque, Rococo, and Classicist 18th-century portraits and battle scenes by Polish and foreign pre-Romantics.