Raatitorni (The Council Tower) is the only remaining part of the medieval Vyborg city walls. After the wall was demolished it functioned as a bell tower of near church. The tower was damaged in Winter War, but restored later.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

A127, Vyborg, Russia
See all sites in Vyborg

Details

Founded: 1470s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dmitry Shutko (43 days ago)
Красиво, умели же строить!
Станислав Сидоренко (3 months ago)
Прекрасный и разрушающийся на глазах город Выборг наконец-то стали немного восстанавливать. Один из объектов реставрация - это башня ратуши названная так, потому что во время осады города ее должны были оборонять члены городской ратуши) После реставрации конечно преобразилась полностью
Александр Калашников (4 months ago)
Это Выборг, это очень стильно и красиво.
Павел Тимонов (5 months ago)
прекрасный ветшающий на глазах туристический город. Спешите его посетить, пока он полностью не развалился. Старый город атмосферен и прекрасен, несмотря на то, что за ним крайне плохо ухаживают. Крепостная улица-главная- треть состоит из фасадов уже нежилых зданий. Старинные дома-если сгорают- не реставрируются. Но атмосфера шведско-финнской древности с элементами советского убожества пока впечатляет раз и навсегда.
Филипп Перепелица (5 months ago)
Башня построена в 1470-х годах вместе с прочими башнями оборонительной стены каменного города. Всего башен было девять, две из которых сохранились. В XVII веке башню стали использовать в качестве колокольни собора доминиканского монастыря (после Реформации — церкви Выборгского сельского прихода). Новое назначение постройки стало причиной последующих переделок, исказивших её первоначальный облик. Оригинальный деревянный шпиль башни был уничтожен в последний день советско-финской войны 1939−1940 г., 13 марта 1940 года. Много лет здание стояло пустым и без кровли. В 1952 году в башне начались первые ремонтно-восстановительные работы. С 1997 года башня передана в аренду общине церкви Божьей Матери Державной и приспособлена под церковный музей.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.