Örbyhus Castle

Örbyhus, Sweden

Örbyhus estate existed already in the 14th century, but the first castle was built by John Kristiernsson (Vasa) around then year 1450. It was a strong fortification with tower. Örbyhus remained in a possession of royal Vasa family until the end of 16th century. Gustav Vasa, who acquired Örbyhus through an exchange with his cousins in 1548, constructed the national fortress in the middle of Uppland complete with ramparts, moats and 54-foot-high stone walls around his grandfather’s stronghold tower. In Gustav Vasa’s castle there are many hidden passages and casemates with space for a garrison and stores for many years. The former King Erik XIV was imprisoned in Örbyhus until his death 1574-1577.

Gustav Banér, the governor of Västergötland, acquired Örbyhus in 1641 and rebuild the castle in the present form of a baroque castle. Örbyhus was owned at the beginning of the 18th century by de Geer at Leufsta, who made both Leufsta and Örbyhus the entailed estate of his nephew, the scientist Charles de Geer. During the 200 years that followed it was the names of de Geer, von Platen, de la Gardie, Klingspor and Barnekow that left their mark on Örbyhus.

In 1900 the castle was purchased by Count Carl Gustav von Rosen; it was taken over during the same year by Count Eugène von Rosen, who commissioned extensive restoration and decoration work for the building.

Today guided tours are arranged during most of the summer season of King Erik XIV’s prison, the castle park and the carriage museum.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1450
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Per Björlin (3 years ago)
Interesting history of this castle.
Brown Andrew (3 years ago)
Amazing piece of Swedish history
Markus Marttila (4 years ago)
Beautiful castle stepped in history. Concerts arranged occasionally, guided tours available. Lovely place for a picnic but the amount of mosquitoes can be ridiculous.
Carl Niclas (4 years ago)
Steeped in Swedish history, but a bit off the beaten track. A guided tour is required to enter the castle.
Daniel Grönjord (4 years ago)
Interesting castle with an interesting history. Nice photo ops in the park too.
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