Ottarshögen is an large burial mound built in the 6th or 7th century AD. According the folk legend, it is a grave of ancient Ottar Vendelkråka, the king of Svealand in the early 6th century. Archaeologists have anyway dated it to the Vendel Period. The mound is 37m wide and 6m high.

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Address

714, Örbyhus, Sweden
See all sites in Örbyhus

Details

Founded: 500-600 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Sweden
Historical period: Vendel Period (Sweden)

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johan (2 years ago)
There is so much potential for this place that unfortunately has not been taken advantage of. The best parking is on the farm but it is not clear. The problem is probably a lack of public interest, which can be fixed with an interest campaign now that people have holidays at home.
skeptical spectre (3 years ago)
This part of Sweden's history is a bit poorly advertised. Swedish role players aged 35 and up associate it with the adventure "Sulfur Winter". For the rest of the world, this is an important historical starting point for the "Vendel Age". The burial mound itself looks like a smaller hill fitted between a narrower asphalt road and a wooded slope. At the sides, old gravel pits can be seen that have destroyed several, small burial mounds nearby. In the pile is a powerful person buried, burnt bones of a woman and a man have been found, as well as weapons and valuables. Parking and accessibility for the disabled is lousy. Vehicles should be placed at the nearby farm, but there is no information about this. In addition, there is a lack of access to toilets and the possibility of disposing of waste.
Magnus Stenmark (3 years ago)
Nice environment with plenty of insects
Jonas Lyckman (5 years ago)
Fint kungshög från skiftet mellan folkvandringstid och Vendeltid. Parkering uppe vid bygdegården.
Jonas Lyckman (5 years ago)
Nice royal mound from the shift between migration time and Vendel time. Parking up by the village farm.
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