The first Edsberg building was constructed of wood around 1630 as an estate for Henrik Olofsson. It was very soon after completion signed over to count Gabriel Bengtsson Oxenstierna who changed it into a manor in 1647. Queen Christina of Sweden visited and stayed in the house in 1645. In 1670, when the manor had been inherited by the son Gabriel Gabrielsson Oxenstierna, King Charles XI of Sweden and the Queen Dowager Hedvig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp came for a visit.

The manor later belonged to the Rudbeck family, the first of which was the Over-Governor of Stockholm, Thure Gustaf Rudbeck. In 1760 he replaced the old wooden construction with the stone building still in standing and in use today. The main building was most likely designed by architect Carl Wijnblad in simplified French rococo style and had two floors, plastered façade and two wings.

Malla Silfverstolpe, 1782-1861, grew up in the castle. Her diary gives a vivid and fascinating account of life at Edsberg during this time. The Rudbecks were owners of the castle for about 200 years, upon which the county of Sollentuna assumed ownership in 1959. It has since then been used for higher musical education.

The castle has undergone extensive renovation and housed Sveriges Radios Musikskola (the music school of the Swedish National Radio). It now houses Edsbergs Musikinstitut; the independent chamber music division of the Royal College of Music, Stockholm.

A section of the castle and the garden is rented out for private and corporate events. An art gallery, Edsvik Konsthall, is located on the castle's premises.

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Details

Founded: 1760
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dr Ali A.Mohamedi, Stockholm (7 months ago)
Really liked the place House of art and decorated with artistic statues in open air. Free parking is a plus. Good place for jogging while you enjoy a picturesque view. Recommended for tourists all seasons long.
Edvard Nord (9 months ago)
Big but you can't se everything
August Hull (10 months ago)
Beautiful scenery, cozy lake view, quiet place
Andreas (11 months ago)
Brilliant place, loving it. Had piano lessons here a long time ago and the building itself is impressive. The walk around the area is also wonderful
Stefan Wendorf (12 months ago)
Beautyful and friendly place for a couple of chilled and peaceful hours on a sunny day. Perfect!
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