Vecdole Castle Ruins

Salaspils, Latvia

Vecdole Castle (Schloss Alt-Dahlen) was built in the early 13th century (before 1226 when it was first time mentioned). It was built as a vassal castle for the arcbishop of Riga and destroyed already in 1298. Today only ruins remain.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: ca. 1226
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dave Schofield (10 months ago)
Very moving experience, went on my own and was the only person there. Listen out for the heartbeat
Cristian Carbini (11 months ago)
Never Again!!! It's one of the most important memorial about Jewish genocide in Latvia. Children have to come here to learn what a man can do to another.
Преподобный Гомер (11 months ago)
Great memorial. Very emotional. Definitely worth visiting.
Nicolaj Dahl Andersen (11 months ago)
Fantastic place and memorial for the deceased during World War II. The place has a really calm and peaceful atmosphere, which inspired to think about the things in life that really matter. The respectfulness of the memorial statues and the information inside the building was intelligent and admirable!
Ilo Kse (12 months ago)
We took the train from Rīga to train station Dārziņi. Crossed the railway. Then passed the station building. On it's right side there is sign that shows direction of Salaspils Memorial Ensemble. We had to walk about 2km. The Ensemble is very impressive and well kept...There is also museum that shows the history, photographs and personal items ...
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

After having been exposed to all kinds of weather for a thousand years cracks are beginning to show. On the 15th of November 2008 experts from UNESCO examined the stones to determine their condition. Experts requested that the stones be moved to an indoor exhibition hall, or in some other way protected in situ, to prevent further damage from the weather.

Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.