Daugavgriva Castle Ruins

Riga, Latvia

Daugavgrīva Castle was originally a monastery converted as a fortress by Swedish in the 17th century. Today there are no remnants of the medieval castle above the soil.

In 1208 there was a Dünaburg castle built by the Teutonic Knights which initially served as a monastery. The Swedish fortress of Dünamünde, designed in a Dutch style by General Rothenburg in 1641, replaced the ruined Daugavgrīva Castle by 1680. In 1695 the Commandant was captain Heinrich Nicolaus Rüdinger, forefather of future Patriarch Alexy II of Russia. Rüdinger was knighted by Charles XI of Sweden. Joachim Cronman later became the Commandant and he died on March 5, 1703.

After the fortress was seized by the Russians they reconstructed it. Regent Anna Leopoldovna of Russia, her husband Anthony Ulrich, and her son Ivan VI were incarcerated in Dünamünde in 1742. A local Lutheran church was rebuilt into the Orthodox Church of the Saviour's Transfiguration in 1775. The Russian government renamed the fortress, where only Russian soldiers were living, to Ust-Dvinsk in 1893. They had its fortifications completely reconstructed prior to World War I. During the war Ust-Dvinsk was bombarded by the Schütte-Lanz Airship SL 7 of the German Army. After the fortress was taken by Imperial Germany, it was inspected by Emperor Wilhelm II in 1917. The Latvian government, however, demolished much of the fortifications several years later. During the Cold War Ust-Dvinsk was a base for Soviet troops. The site is now known in Latvian as Daugavgrīva. There is a functional lighthouse at Daugavgrīva which was originally built in 1818. It was rebuilt in 1863, 1920, and after World War II.

Nowadays entrance in the area of castle goes along the northeastern corner. Still there is partly visible the old road which was leading from northeastern tower around the forepart of the castle up to the southeastern corner.

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Address

Airu iela 79B, Riga, Latvia
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Details

Founded: 1680
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristaps Kalnozols (16 months ago)
The park is being reconstructed, but the castle ruins are freely accessible. The easiest way to get to them is from the railway side. The artificial castle ruins were built by Adolf von Bingner in his garden as a tribute to the romantic atmosphere of his time. During the German occupation, an anti-aircraft artillery battery was placed in the artificial castle ruins in the park. Since the 1960s, artificial castle ruins have been used as a popular venue for training and competitions for climbers. Currently, due to the ruins of the ruins, the activities of climbers have been suspended, since one climber has died and another has been seriously injured since December 2008. [2] The mountaineering association has recognized the tower as dangerous for climbing, and has asked to restore it, but it is still unknown when this could happen.
Jana Feldmane (3 years ago)
There was park of residence former president of Latvia but now park is wasted and uncared.
Piotr Śliwiński (4 years ago)
Nothing special
Tamara Fedorenko (4 years ago)
Витает дух средневековья
Dmitry Pirma (4 years ago)
Good place
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