Adavere manor was first mentioned in the second half of the 17th century. In the 16th and 17th centuries Adavere was under the rule of Põltsamaa, which as the most important town in Central Estonia administered all of the surrounding land and villages. On maps dating from 1682 Adavere is already marked as a manor. Its massive slate main building was constructed from 1892-1893. The complex also includes auxiliary buildings erected in the late 19th century - a workers' cottage and a barn and drying shed. The park (dating from the 1740s) was one of the grandest in Estonia in its day, although little remains of this today. The Art Nouveau artworks in the main building were restored in 2000. Today the building is home to Adavere School.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1892-1893
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ain Aart (3 months ago)
Ilus koht
Karl-Oscar Trumm (11 months ago)
liiga suur
uno meri (2 years ago)
Tasub vaadata. Igati korras mõisahoone.
Rivo Zängov (4 years ago)
Normaalne spordisaal ja sõbralik personal!
nevermind (4 years ago)
minu kool
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Monet's Garden

Claude Monet lived for forty-three years, from 1883 to 1926, in Giverny. With a passion for gardening as well as for colours, he conceived both his flower garden and water garden as true works of art. Walking through his house and gardens, visitors can still feel the atmosphere which reigned at the home of the Master of Impressionnism and marvel at the floral compositions and nymphéas, his greatest sources of inspiration.

In 1890 Monet had enough money to buy the house and land outright and set out to create the magnificent gardens he wanted to paint. Some of his most famous paintings were of his garden in Giverny, famous for its rectangular Clos normand, with archways of climbing plants entwined around colored shrubs, and the water garden, formed by a tributary to the Epte, with the Japanese bridge, the pond with the water lilies, the wisterias and the azaleas.

Today the Monet's Garden is open to the public.