St. Paul's Church

Viljandi, Estonia

The Lutheran red-brick church of St. Paul was built between 1863-1866. It is designed by Franz Block and Matthias von Holst. The Viljandi estate owner baron Ungern-Stenberg gave the community a part of his estate as building ground for the church.

References:
  • Tapio Mäkeläinen 2005. Viro - kartanoiden, kirkkojen ja kukkaketojen maa. Tammi, Helsinki, Finland.

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Address

Kiriku 3, Viljandi, Estonia
See all sites in Viljandi

Details

Founded: 1863-1866
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

www.visitestonia.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katrin Jõgisaar (15 months ago)
Väga suursugune ja uhke kirik, mida on nüüd mõtet külastada ka geopeituse mängijatel.
Priit Virula (19 months ago)
Ilus ja omapärane
Andrey Guzanov (2 years ago)
Знаковое место уютного городка!
Ivar Merila (3 years ago)
Väga ilus kirik kirikul on pikk ajalugu. Kokku leppel kirikuga saab minna ka kiriku torni
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Kiriku 3, Viljandi, Viljandimaa, 58.364348, 25.592222 ‎ 58° 21' 51.65", 25° 35' 32.00" В середине 19 века в Вильянди была только одна церковь Яани, которая обслуживала, как городских, так и сельских жителей. Город продолжал расти, и одной церкви стало не хватать. Вильяндиский помещик Унгерн-Стенберг дал сельскому приходу участок своей земли для строительства новой церкви. Выстроенная в стиле неоготики (архитектор Маттиас фон Холст) церковь была освещена в 1866 году. Алтарная живопись «Христос на кресте» (Карл Андреа, 1866) привезена из Дрездена, отреставрированная недавно огромная люстра из Нюрнберга (XIX). Самый большой в Эстонии орган с механической трактурой (Гуйдо Кнауф, 1866), памятный камень погибшим на пароме «Эстония» (Пеэтер Лейнбок, 1994). Комната-музей пастора и государственного деятеля Яана Латтика
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