Borgeby Castle

Lomma, Sweden

Borgeby Castle is built on the site of an 11th-century castle or fortress. Excavations on the site may relate it to Harald Bluetooth. It may be reconstructed similar to the Trelleborg type with a diameter of 150 meters. Construction must have been in several phases with two separate ditches. The buildings on the site burned down during the Viking time. Excavations in 1998 found evidence of a mint. This is thought to proof that this site belonged from its beginnings until 1536 to the Archbishop of Lund.

The buildings have been changed over the centuries. Börjes Tower was probably built in the 15th century. The tower stands alone since the eastern wing was demolished in 1860 and renovated in 1870. The gatehouse appears to be from the 16th century but has older parts. The main building of today was built between 1650 and 1660. The stable was built of bricks in 1744.

According to the testament of the archbishop Karl Eriksson († 1334) horses were bred on the grounds during the 14th century. The castle was burned in 1452 by the Swedes and in 1658 by the Danes. Excavation findings also suggest it being burnt in the 16th century though there is nothing to be found in the records. This may have been during the farmers' revolt of 1525.

Since the Danish king Christian III mortgaged the property to the aristocratic Mayor of Malmö, Jørgen Kock, several Danish and Swedish aristocratic families have resided in the castle since the Reformation. As of today it is a museum for the paintings of the artist Ernst Nordlind, whose father-in-law acquired the castle in 1886 at an auction.

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Details

Founded: 1100s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erik Carlberg (9 months ago)
Lovely garden well suited for picnics. The swings are popular with kids. Recommend a visit late April / early May when the cherry trees are in full bloom. The castle hosts an exhibition of Ernst Norlind's art which could be interesting if 20 century paintings with landscape motives are of interest. Storks in particular. By the river, there are canoes and kayaks for rent. Well worth a try.
Erik Carlberg (9 months ago)
Lovely garden well suited for picnics. The swings are popular with kids. Recommend a visit late April / early May when the cherry trees are in full bloom. The castle hosts an exhibition of Ernst Norlind's art which could be interesting if 20 century paintings with landscape motives are of interest. Storks in particular. By the river, there are canoes and kayaks for rent. Well worth a try.
Mikko Simon (10 months ago)
Not that much to see or do, especially with kids. Maybe we came at the wrong time?
Mikko Simon (10 months ago)
Not that much to see or do, especially with kids. Maybe we came at the wrong time?
Cristy Stan (13 months ago)
Was only outside, but it's a great wide open space
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