The chapel in Saha used to be one of the oldest ecclesiastical centres of Rävala Maakond (Shire). Originally, Saha Church was made of wood, it was burnt down around 1223. Four cult stones with small hollows dating from the 1st millennium BC, located close to the chapel indicate that it had been an ancient cult place. The current chapel was built by builders from Tallinn in the second quarter of the 15th century.

Structurally, the chapel bears striking similarities to Pirita Klooster. This simple double-vaulted parallelogram-shaped buiding is slightly asymetrical. Several construction details, like very high placed windows, a corner tower, a high gable roof etc., show that in addition to serving as the house of god, the Chapel had other functions as well. In case of necessity it could become a fortified stronghold protecting against enemy attacks, a resting place for pilgrims or a storage room for merchants. The chapel was badly damaged during the Great Northern War and was restored as recently as 1962-1969.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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www.rebala.ee

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User Reviews

Karl Eensaar (10 months ago)
Keskaegne arhitektuur
Rein Kuusik (14 months ago)
Ilus kabel ja muistne koht.
Святослав (2 years ago)
Старинное маленькое кладбище с часовней, необыкновенное место.
Andres Meikar (2 years ago)
Omamoodi põnev koht
Anatoly Ko (6 years ago)
Saha küla, Saha kalmistu,Kostivere tee, Jõelähtme, Harjumaa 59.420709, 24.982660‎ 59° 25' 14.55", 24° 58' 57.58" Часовня находится в Харьюмаа, Йыеляхтме в районе деревни Саха,согласно преданиям, часовня была возведена датчанином Никола Туве, Св. Николай Чудотворец является покровителем часовни . 15-ый век Саха-одна из самых старых часовень, которая сохранилась целиком. Она была построенная ещё во времена средневековья. Часовню окружает кладбище, построенное предположительно в 1220 году. К 1223 году относят первые упоминания о кладбище. В средневековье, часовня находилась на попечении церкви Юри, в 16 веке, часовня стала принадлежать церкви Йыэляхтме. Современную часовню построили таллиннские мастера, во второй половине 15 века, по традиции передавать знания из уст в уста, по образу и подобию монастыря Падизе. Двухсводчатая часовня построена из плитняка, она являестя достаточно пропорциональным сооружением. Основной план здания является довольно простым, в северо-западном углу расположена винтовая башенная лестница, на подобие тех, которые строились в больших монастырях и церквях Таллинна. В интерьере также просматриваются таллиннские мотивы. Посреди часовни расположена одиночная арка, которая опирается на длинные плоские консоли. В сводчатых стенах алтаря находятся широкие сегментарные углубления. На западной стене, находится главный портал с однофазным профилем, на южной стене находится боковой портал (рестаур). Около главного портала расположена уникальная ниша, где расположен сосуд с водой, с севера ниши вода утекает через узкий канал часовни. Обе двери снабжены задвижками, при помощи которых двери закрываются, это отдаёт должное защитной функциональности часовни. Для этой часовни характерны узкие длинные окна, их рама выполнена из монополитных плитняковых пластин, это придаёт им архаичный вид. В часовне сохранился плитняковый стол алтаря.
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Porta Nigra

The Porta Nigra (Latin for black gate) is the largest Roman city gate north of the Alps. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site. The name Porta Nigra originated in the Middle Ages due to the darkened colour of its stone; the original Roman name has not been preserved. Locals commonly refer to the Porta Nigra simply as Porta.

The Porta Nigra was built in grey sandstone between 186 and 200 AD. The original gate consisted of two four-storied towers, projecting as near semicircles on the outer side. A narrow courtyard separated the two gate openings on either side. For unknown reasons, however, the construction of the gate remained unfinished. For example, the stones at the northern (outer) side of the gate were never abraded, and the protruding stones would have made it impossible to install movable gates. Nonetheless, the gate was used for several centuries until the end of the Roman era in Trier.

In Roman times, the Porta Nigra was part of a system of four city gates, one of which stood at each side of the roughly rectangular Roman city. The Porta Nigra guarded the northern entry to the Roman city, while the Porta Alba (White Gate) was built in the east, the Porta Media (Middle Gate) in the south, and the Porta Inclyta (Famous Gate) in the west, next to the Roman bridge across the Moselle. The gates stood at the ends of the two main streets of the Roman Trier, one of which led north-south and the other east-west. Of these gates, only the Porta Nigra still exists today.

In the early Middle Ages the Roman city gates were no longer used for their original function and their stones were taken and reused for other buildings. Also iron and lead braces were broken out of the walls of the Porta Nigra for reuse. Traces of this destruction are still clearly visible on the north side of the gate.

After 1028, the Greek monk Simeon lived as a hermit in the ruins of the Porta Nigra. After his death (1035) and sanctification, the Simeonstift monastery was built next to the Porta Nigra to honor him. Saving it from further destruction, the Porta Nigra was transformed into a church: The inner court of the gate was roofed and intermediate ceilings were inserted. The two middle storeys of the former gate were converted into church naves: the upper storey being for the monks and the lower storey for the general public. The ground floor with the large gates was sealed, and a large outside staircase was constructed alongside the south side (the town side) of the gate, up to the lower storey of the church. A small staircase led further up to the upper storey. The church rooms were accessible through former windows of the western tower of the Porta Nigra that were enlarged to become entrance doors (still visible today). The top floor of the western tower was used as church tower, the eastern tower was leveled, and an apse added at its east side. An additional gate - the much smaller Simeon Gate - was built adjacent to the East side of the Porta Nigra and served as a city gate in medieval times.

In 1802 Napoleon Bonaparte dissolved the church in the Porta Nigra and the monastery beside it, along with the vast majority of Trier"s numerous churches and monasteries. On his visit to Trier in 1804, Napoleon ordered that the Porta Nigra be converted back to its Roman form. Only the apse was kept; but the eastern tower was not rebuilt to its original height. Local legend has it that Napoleon originally wanted to completely tear down the church, but locals convinced him that the church had actually been a Gaulish festival hall before being turned into a church. Another version of the story is that they told him about its Roman origins, persuading him to convert the gate back to its original form.

In 1986 the Porta Nigra was designated a World Heritage Site, along with other Roman monuments in Trier and its surroundings. The modern appearance of the Porta Nigra goes back almost unchanged to the reconstruction ordered by Napoleon. At the south side of the Porta Nigra, remains of Roman columns line the last 100 m of the street leading to the gate. Positioned where they had stood in Roman times, they give a slight impression of the aspect of the original Roman street that was lined with colonnades. The Porta Nigra, including the upper floors, is open to visitors.