The chapel in Saha used to be one of the oldest ecclesiastical centres of Rävala Maakond (Shire). Originally, Saha Church was made of wood, it was burnt down around 1223. Four cult stones with small hollows dating from the 1st millennium BC, located close to the chapel indicate that it had been an ancient cult place. The current chapel was built by builders from Tallinn in the second quarter of the 15th century.

Structurally, the chapel bears striking similarities to Pirita Klooster. This simple double-vaulted parallelogram-shaped buiding is slightly asymetrical. Several construction details, like very high placed windows, a corner tower, a high gable roof etc., show that in addition to serving as the house of god, the Chapel had other functions as well. In case of necessity it could become a fortified stronghold protecting against enemy attacks, a resting place for pilgrims or a storage room for merchants. The chapel was badly damaged during the Great Northern War and was restored as recently as 1962-1969.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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www.rebala.ee

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User Reviews

Karl Eensaar (2 years ago)
Keskaegne arhitektuur
Rein Kuusik (2 years ago)
Ilus kabel ja muistne koht.
Святослав (3 years ago)
Старинное маленькое кладбище с часовней, необыкновенное место.
Andres Meikar (3 years ago)
Omamoodi põnev koht
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Saha küla, Saha kalmistu,Kostivere tee, Jõelähtme, Harjumaa 59.420709, 24.982660‎ 59° 25' 14.55", 24° 58' 57.58" Часовня находится в Харьюмаа, Йыеляхтме в районе деревни Саха,согласно преданиям, часовня была возведена датчанином Никола Туве, Св. Николай Чудотворец является покровителем часовни . 15-ый век Саха-одна из самых старых часовень, которая сохранилась целиком. Она была построенная ещё во времена средневековья. Часовню окружает кладбище, построенное предположительно в 1220 году. К 1223 году относят первые упоминания о кладбище. В средневековье, часовня находилась на попечении церкви Юри, в 16 веке, часовня стала принадлежать церкви Йыэляхтме. Современную часовню построили таллиннские мастера, во второй половине 15 века, по традиции передавать знания из уст в уста, по образу и подобию монастыря Падизе. Двухсводчатая часовня построена из плитняка, она являестя достаточно пропорциональным сооружением. Основной план здания является довольно простым, в северо-западном углу расположена винтовая башенная лестница, на подобие тех, которые строились в больших монастырях и церквях Таллинна. В интерьере также просматриваются таллиннские мотивы. Посреди часовни расположена одиночная арка, которая опирается на длинные плоские консоли. В сводчатых стенах алтаря находятся широкие сегментарные углубления. На западной стене, находится главный портал с однофазным профилем, на южной стене находится боковой портал (рестаур). Около главного портала расположена уникальная ниша, где расположен сосуд с водой, с севера ниши вода утекает через узкий канал часовни. Обе двери снабжены задвижками, при помощи которых двери закрываются, это отдаёт должное защитной функциональности часовни. Для этой часовни характерны узкие длинные окна, их рама выполнена из монополитных плитняковых пластин, это придаёт им архаичный вид. В часовне сохранился плитняковый стол алтаря.
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