The chapel in Saha used to be one of the oldest ecclesiastical centres of Rävala Maakond (Shire). Originally, Saha Church was made of wood, it was burnt down around 1223. Four cult stones with small hollows dating from the 1st millennium BC, located close to the chapel indicate that it had been an ancient cult place. The current chapel was built by builders from Tallinn in the second quarter of the 15th century.

Structurally, the chapel bears striking similarities to Pirita Klooster. This simple double-vaulted parallelogram-shaped buiding is slightly asymetrical. Several construction details, like very high placed windows, a corner tower, a high gable roof etc., show that in addition to serving as the house of god, the Chapel had other functions as well. In case of necessity it could become a fortified stronghold protecting against enemy attacks, a resting place for pilgrims or a storage room for merchants. The chapel was badly damaged during the Great Northern War and was restored as recently as 1962-1969.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.rebala.ee

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Korhonen (15 months ago)
A wonderfully great experience
Ola Stefańska (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful place
Ola Frączkowska (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful place
tarmo vaarask (3 years ago)
Nice!
Luca Marzola (3 years ago)
Nice old chapel with a surrounding cemetery.
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