Suure-Kõpu Manor

Kõpu, Estonia

Suure-Kõpu (Gross-Köppo) manor dates back to 1487. During the larger part of its history it belonged to different Baltic aristocratic families. After Estonia gained its independence in 1919, the manor began to be used as a school house. The current building was erected in 1847 and is one of the latest classicist manor houses to be built in Estonia. The rather large manor house shows close resemblance with the Kuremaa manor house, which was built by the same architect, Emil Julius Strauss. The manor house was, from the outset, lavishly decorated inside with frescoes and wall-paintings in classicist style, and at a later time Art Nouveau decoration in Papier-mâché and imitation stucco were added. However, during the Soviet occupation of Estonia, these decorations were deemed unfitting and painted over. They were re-discovered in the 1970's and have in recent years been painstakingly restored.

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Address

Pärnu maantee 8, Kõpu, Estonia
See all sites in Kõpu

Details

Founded: 1847
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eneli Käger (2 years ago)
As well as possible.
Ирина Лукс (3 years ago)
The beautiful manor impresses with its size. The building has been restored and is used as a school. We found there a summer music camp for schoolchildren.
Kristiina Mikhriakova (3 years ago)
Super
Tanya Andrejeva (3 years ago)
We happened to drive past the Kõpu manor and of course we could take a closer look at the manor, the manor is beautiful and the surroundings were all right?☀️?night to see☺️
Rasmus Merimaa (4 years ago)
Nice
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