Maltesholm Castle

Kristianstad, Sweden

Maltesholm Castle The castle has been passed down for generations and is now the private residence of the Baron Palmstierna. The castle was originally constructed between 1635 and 1638 by the high constable of Kristianstad, Malte Juel, during the Danish rule of Scania, but the history of the estate goes back to the Middle ages and it was owned by the Brahe family. Typical for its time, the castle was a Renaissance manor built in brick with three floors, a staircase tower with an elaborate spire, two crow-stepped gables and surrounded by a large moat.

During the life of Lord Malte Ramel (d. 1752), one of the richest men in Sweden of the time, the domains were greatly expanded. His son Hans Ramel began reconstructing the castle according to the style of the late 18th century. It was completed in 1780 in the style of Swedish classical palace; the only remains of the Renaissance castle are the moat and the year 1680 marked on the facade. Hans Ramel also constructed a 1.3 kilometres long stone road leading up to the Mansion through the undulating landscape. The road had to be even and it took almost 50 years to complete. The workers had to bring a rock every day to the Manor for the construction and there was a grateful saying amongst the workers: If it wasn't for the Folly of a Rich man there wouldn't be bread for the Poor.

In the garden you can find an enormous douglas fir which measures 35 meters tall and is more than 100 years old. There is also a pavilion by the great classical Swedish architect Carl Hårleman. The beautiful garden is open to the public.

References:
  • Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1780
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Latpotatis (2 years ago)
Not much to see. There was a Rundslinga in the forest that was not worth seeing.
Daniel Nilsson (3 years ago)
Good walk, with a touch of the old
muhair abumgaiseeb (4 years ago)
Nice mansion from the 17th century
Jane Ågren (4 years ago)
Där va jätte vackert och mysigt att gå, man kunde äta god vegansk sallad med säsongens grönsaker, dom hade en heeelt faktiskt vegansk blåbärspaj
IdaK Skuggan Olsson (4 years ago)
Blev oerhört förvånad så vackert här var.
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