Örenäs Castle is German Baroque style castle was raised in 1914-1918. It's now a hotel and conference centre with a public restaurant. During WWII Danish and Estonian refugees were hosted here. It's known to be the youngest castle in both Scania and Sweden.

References:
  • Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1914-1918
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Lee (4 months ago)
Great Location for a Training Course I taught an IT training course here. We has the class in one of the huts in the gardens of this fine castle, but ate in the main house. There is a seperaate 'hotel' block. The accommodation was good - although we did not have daily room cleaning service. The food was fantastic. The views from the dining room was stunning, over Oresund. Breakfast, especially the scrambled eggs, was excelent. I loved the other meals too! Would love to return.
Ashish Saini (5 months ago)
Good place, a bit offsite (middle of no where)
christian nielsen (6 months ago)
Very good dining, hotel under renovation during my stay
veronica pedersen (7 months ago)
Beautiful place. Too bad the staff didnt know how to tend the bar (cause the one man who knew was asleep/off duty). Great gardens.
Mladen Lukic (12 months ago)
This hotel is worth visiting for its really beautiful surrounding. Hotel itself has very nice park with paths to take a walk. It also has mini golf course, nice outdoor swimming pool. Rooms are standard to spacy. For example, like elsewhere in Scandinavia, you will not find a shower tub in the bathroom, just a tiled floor. However, wonderful view from the park over the small harbour is breathing.
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