National Museum

Gdańsk, Poland

The National Museum in Gdańsk (Muzeum Narodowe w Gdańsku), established in 1972 (although the history goes back the third quarter of 19th century), is one of the main branches of Poland's National Museum system. Its main location is in the old Franciscan monastery, which has been used to house exhibits since the end of the 19th century. Currently the museum has seven departments.

The first floor is given over to paintings, with a section devoted to Dutch and Flemish work. The jewel of the collection is Hans Memling's (1435-94) triptych of the Last Judgment, one of the earlier works of the artist, dating from 1472 to 1473. You'll also find works by the younger Brueghel and Van Dyck, and the beautifully macabre Hell by Jacob Swanenburgh, who was the master of the young Rembrandt.

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Address

Toruńska 1, Gdańsk, Poland
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Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Юлия Федосенко (3 years ago)
Great museum, beautiful exhibitions, impressive architecture
Frédéric Wah (3 years ago)
A great museum just a little bit outside of the busy Gdańsk. It got great collection of silver and painting. Old medieval painting were quite impressive. And I was surprised by their collections of Dutch painting. Anyway, a nice museum to do when you're in Gdańsk. Especially on Friday because it's free!
Giacomo Spagnoli (3 years ago)
A fine collection of paintings around its masterpiece: 1471 Memling's Last Judgement.
Thomas Robichaud (3 years ago)
An appealing and interesting collection of art exhibits. Environmental conditioning left much to be desired. English speakers should keep in mind that only a few of the exhibits have English text in the descriptions.
Vykintas Valužis (3 years ago)
A good museum, but I think a title is a bit misleading: it's called "National Museum of Gdańsk", but actually its just an art gallery (except the few original furniture). But of course, The Last Judgment by Hans Memling is magnificient and definitely worth seeing. Other paintings are also very good. I recommend going it there on Friday, because the entrance is free then.
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