Uphagens’ House

Gdańsk, Poland

The Uphagen House was erected in the second half of the 18th century by Jan Uphagen, who obliged future owners to preserve the house in its original form. Thanks to this agreement, the building’s original character has been preserved and now houses the Museum of Patrician Interiors. The Uphagen House is a memory of Gdańsk’s former glory. It features a hall, lofty interiors, a stone slab floor built and walls and ceilings decorated with stucco work.

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Address

Długa 12, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1775-1787
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paweł (3 months ago)
Uphagen House is located on St. Long 12 Street and is only restored in Gdansk with his middle-class apartment house design. At the end of XV century this place was built in brick building. Its relics are now in the basement of an existing building. In the following centuries, it often changed the property owners and the house had numerous transformations and finally in 1775 was bought and rebuilt by Uphagen Johann, a merchant, an amateur historian, bibliophile. After the death of building owner property remained in family hands and has survived almost intact until the early XX century. In 1911 the museum opened in the building interior, which operated until 1944. Then the upcoming actions against war were evacuated home decor and furnishings in the vicinity of Gdansk. In 1981 the house was given to the Historical Museum of Gdansk and in 1998 was open to the public. Museum was closed because of Covid-19 but I was at least lucky to see building from the back. It is much longer than others. After 2 world war the other buildings were rubuilt shorter and here you can imagine how it looked previously.
Kasia Myszka (9 months ago)
Nice place to visit if you would like to see the oldschool interiors. It's a quick and cheap visit and worth the time.
Claudiu (16 months ago)
The house itself is a beautiful reconstruction but the so called museum is very poor in terms of curation and organization The price is 16zl which is exorbitant for hardly 20 minutes in the place, even if you try to milk it and want to absorb the beauty even more you can't spend more than half an hour here The curation is very bad as there are hardly any descriptions and those that are available are only in Polish with the exception of some stuff at the end of the tour
Marta (16 months ago)
The museum was interesting but we found it a bit small. It's a good place to go if you don't have a lot of time during your visit in Gdańsk
Ivan Spirydonau (2 years ago)
Greatly preserved residence of Uphagen’s family. Nice decor and fascinating furniture. Definitely worth a short visit!
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