Uphagens’ House

Gdańsk, Poland

The Uphagen House was erected in the second half of the 18th century by Jan Uphagen, who obliged future owners to preserve the house in its original form. Thanks to this agreement, the building’s original character has been preserved and now houses the Museum of Patrician Interiors. The Uphagen House is a memory of Gdańsk’s former glory. It features a hall, lofty interiors, a stone slab floor built and walls and ceilings decorated with stucco work.

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Address

Długa 12, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1775-1787
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Михаил Смирнов (2 years ago)
Дійсно унікальний музей, цікаві експозиції, хоч не дуже великий, але 5 хвилин тут аж ніяк не вистачить, не менше півгодини треба :) За свою ціну - цілком те, що треба. Білет недорогий як для польських музеїв, а букінг на нього ще й знижку дає.
Jakub Im (2 years ago)
Śliczna, odremontowana kamienica z XVII wieku, w której możemy zobaczyć jak wyglądało życie ówczesnych mieszkańców Gdańska. Jest to jedno z moich ulubionych miejsc, do którego zawsze chętnie się wybieram i które uczciwie polecam. Bilet wstępu jest niedrogi, a wrażenia z muzeum niezapomniane.
Cecilia Löfving (2 years ago)
Uphagen House är ett fantastiskt vackert museum med inträde till ett bra pris. Vackra tapeter, handmålade väggmålningar och vissa originaldetaljer tar andan ur en. Huset förstördes under andra världskriget men har efter det byggts upp för att visa upp sin forna prakt. Möblerna är antika handsnickerier med fantastiska detaljer. Vi undrade lite över om människorna med brickor var vakter, men det visade sig senare att de var guider (tror jag, jag är fortfarande inte säker). Han som vi pratade med var mycket kunnig och lärde oss mycket. I övrigt verkade guiderna (eller vad de nu var) otroligt uttråkade och undvek kontakt med besökarna.
Marie Marsh (3 years ago)
Interesting museum that gives you a fascinating view of how wealthy merchants lived. Fabulous furniture.
Filip Zakrzewski (4 years ago)
A nicely looking museum of the citizens of Gdańsk from the middle ages
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