Uphagens’ House

Gdańsk, Poland

The Uphagen House was erected in the second half of the 18th century by Jan Uphagen, who obliged future owners to preserve the house in its original form. Thanks to this agreement, the building’s original character has been preserved and now houses the Museum of Patrician Interiors. The Uphagen House is a memory of Gdańsk’s former glory. It features a hall, lofty interiors, a stone slab floor built and walls and ceilings decorated with stucco work.

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Address

Długa 12, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1775-1787
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Михаил Смирнов (3 years ago)
Дійсно унікальний музей, цікаві експозиції, хоч не дуже великий, але 5 хвилин тут аж ніяк не вистачить, не менше півгодини треба :) За свою ціну - цілком те, що треба. Білет недорогий як для польських музеїв, а букінг на нього ще й знижку дає.
Jakub Im (3 years ago)
Śliczna, odremontowana kamienica z XVII wieku, w której możemy zobaczyć jak wyglądało życie ówczesnych mieszkańców Gdańska. Jest to jedno z moich ulubionych miejsc, do którego zawsze chętnie się wybieram i które uczciwie polecam. Bilet wstępu jest niedrogi, a wrażenia z muzeum niezapomniane.
Cecilia Löfving (3 years ago)
Uphagen House är ett fantastiskt vackert museum med inträde till ett bra pris. Vackra tapeter, handmålade väggmålningar och vissa originaldetaljer tar andan ur en. Huset förstördes under andra världskriget men har efter det byggts upp för att visa upp sin forna prakt. Möblerna är antika handsnickerier med fantastiska detaljer. Vi undrade lite över om människorna med brickor var vakter, men det visade sig senare att de var guider (tror jag, jag är fortfarande inte säker). Han som vi pratade med var mycket kunnig och lärde oss mycket. I övrigt verkade guiderna (eller vad de nu var) otroligt uttråkade och undvek kontakt med besökarna.
Marie Marsh (4 years ago)
Interesting museum that gives you a fascinating view of how wealthy merchants lived. Fabulous furniture.
Filip Zakrzewski (5 years ago)
A nicely looking museum of the citizens of Gdańsk from the middle ages
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Glimmingehus is the best preserved medieval stronghold in Scandinavia. It was built 1499-1506, during an era when Scania formed a vital part of Denmark, and contains many defensive arrangements of the era, such as parapets, false doors and dead-end corridors, 'murder-holes' for pouring boiling pitch over the attackers, moats, drawbridges and various other forms of death traps to surprise trespassers and protect the nobles against peasant uprisings. The lower part of the castle's stone walls are 2.4 meters (94 inches) thick and the upper part 1.8 meters (71 inches).

Construction was started in 1499 by the Danish knight Jens Holgersen Ulfstand and stone-cutter-mason and architect Adam van Düren, a North German master who also worked on Lund Cathedral. Construction was completed in 1506.

Ulfstand was a councillor, nobleman and admiral serving under John I of Denmark and many objects have been uncovered during archeological excavations that demonstrate the extravagant lifestyle of the knight's family at Glimmingehus up until Ulfstand's death in 1523. Some of the most expensive objects for sale in Europe during this period, such as Venetian glass, painted glass from the Rhine district and Spanish ceramics have been found here. Evidence of the family's wealth can also be seen inside the stone fortress, where everyday comforts for the knight's family included hot air channels in the walls and bench seats in the window recesses. Although considered comfortable for its period, it has also been argued that Glimmingehus was an expression of "Knighthood nostalgia" and not considered opulent or progressive enough even to the knight's contemporaries and especially not to later generations of the Scanian nobility. Glimmingehus is thought to have served as a residential castle for only a few generations before being transformed into a storage facility for grain.

An order from Charles XI to the administrators of the Swedish dominion of Scania in 1676 to demolish the castle, in order to ensure that it would not fall into the hands of the Danish king during the Scanian War, could not be executed. A first attempt, in which 20 Scanian farmers were ordered to assist, proved unsuccessful. An additional force of 130 men were sent to Glimmingehus to execute the order in a second attempt. However, before they could carry out the order, a Danish-Dutch naval division arrived in Ystad, and the Swedes had to abandon the demolition attempts. Throughout the 18th century the castle was used as deposit for agricultural produce and in 1924 it was donated to the Swedish state. Today it is administered by the Swedish National Heritage Board.

On site there is a museum, medieval kitchen, shop and restaurant and coffee house. During summer time there are several guided tours daily. In local folklore, the castle is described as haunted by multiple ghosts and the tradition of storytelling inspired by the castle is continued in the summer events at the castle called "Strange stories and terrifying tales".