Just to the north and completely overshadowed by St Mary's Church, sits the small Royal Chapel, squeezed between two houses. The only Baroque church in old Gdańsk, it was built between 1678 and 1681 to fulfil the last will of the primate of Poland of the time, Andrzej Olszowski. It was designed by famous royal architect Tylman van Gameren. Its façade is its more attractive feature, and bears the coats of arms of Poland, Lithuania and King Jan III Sobieski (the founder of the chapel).

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Founded: 1678-1681
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Moopan's Beautiful World (2 years ago)
Wonderful
Positive Life (2 years ago)
Nice place
J Tokarsky (2 years ago)
Attended mass here with my group. The staff was very helpful. Be sure to check the presider's chair.
Kim Olsson (2 years ago)
Beautiful building just by the big church
anna masłowska (2 years ago)
Great place for a short visit.
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