Forum Marinum

Turku, Finland

The Forum Marinum Maritime Centre exhibits seafaring history and traditions of the nautical culture in the southwest of Finland, history of the naval forces and the maritime history collections of Åbo Akademi University and Provincial Museum.

In addition to permanent and temporary exhibitions there are several museum ships located to the museum or near Aurajoki river. Most well-known ships are full-rigger Suomen Jousten (built in Saint-Nazaire in 1902) and barque Sigyn (built in Gothenburg in 1887). Finnish naval forces are also well represented including the minelayer Keihässalmi and the corvette Karjala.

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Address

Linnankatu 72, Turku, Finland
See all sites in Turku

Details

Founded: 1999
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

idolezal (3 years ago)
Best ship/port museum I ever visited. Its big and provide a lot of information and quality of expositions is very high. Pls mind there are two sections of the museum in two separate buildings. Both worth to visit
Xavier Palmer (3 years ago)
Very impressive. A large amount of the exhibits were hands on, which I found to be unique and a big bonus to the museum. The museum covers all aspects of Finnish maritime history and incorporates technology very well. There are also around 5 or 6 ships that you can go on and look through as part of the museum.
Timo Hongisto (3 years ago)
Good place to visit if you are interested in ship, boats and history of shipbuilding. On riverside you can visit inside of old ships and military vessels. Also there are Bore ship that has hotel rooms inside.
Catalin Munteanu (3 years ago)
This is my first maritime museum that I visited and I was impressed. You can find two tall sail ships, four naval ships and several smaller vessels, ranging from a steam harbour tugboat to a police boat. There are indoor presentation about the Finnish maritime history, boat presentations and boat shop also. Also, the first gunship, Karjala (see photos), built in 1918 in Turku. The museum ships are open during the summer months only.
Jenni K (3 years ago)
An interesting and versatile museum, one of the best in Turku. A lot of information about the history of shipwreck. The entry ticket paid 9 euro, worth the money. Also available is a two-day bracelet, which also has a museum on the ship. The museum also has a nice restaurant.
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The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

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