Aboa Vetus & Ars Nova

Turku, Finland

Aboa Vetus (Old Turku) is a museum of archaeological history. Originally, plans were for only Ars Nova, the contemporary art museum, but during its construction a number of structures and artifacts dating back to the Middle Ages were discovered, and the archaeological excavation that was commissioned eventually transformed into Aboa Vetus. The two museums were combined in 2004.

The ruins excavated in the Convent Quarter originate from the Middle Ages. In the midst of these ruins, museum visitors progress through the permanent exhibition, which focuses on the 15th century. The artefacts on display originate from the excavations carried out in the town quarter where the museum actually sits.

Reference: Aboa Vetus & Ars Nova

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Details

Founded: ca. 15th century
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna-Maria Heino (3 years ago)
A cozy little museum with some ruins of old Turku as well as modern art. Interesting place and even a good cafe. Museum shop is full of interesting, if not a tiny bit over prized stuff that has to do with modern arts and Turku. You should definitely consider visiting.
Emiel Mostert (3 years ago)
Turku is a town you should not miss. Art all over town and some great museums, this is one of them. Just go and enjoy.
Manuel Pereiras Torres (3 years ago)
The historical exhibition (Aboa Vetus) is good, but the Ars Nova now has just one exhibition in the first floor, and the other in the second floor is only pictures and texts about the history of the Palace that the museum was before(and I was expecting some modern art) . Also all the balconies were closed. So maybe is not the best time of the year to visit the museum
Bianca W (3 years ago)
This place is two museums in one! Downstairs, there are medieval ruins and exhibits on historic Finland, and upstairs you'll find a modern art gallery, and a river runs right through the building, which makes for an amazing café in between the two museum areas! The medieval ruins were re-discovered during excavations in 1995 and include a church and residential buildings with lots of information about the time period. Upstairs in the contemporary art gallery, exhibitions and installations are constantly changing. This one's well worth a visit!
Kai Kimppa (3 years ago)
The permanent exhibition changes from the museum’s own wide variety of art with the changing exhibitions, thus making both sides always worth seeing. The restaurant has one of the best lunches in the city, and if you take the full lunch, including a very filling salad table and Mbakery’s always interesting cakes you won’t leave hungry even if you came in so.
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.