Grand Hotel in Sopot, Poland was originally built in 1924–1927 at a cost of 20 million Danzig gulden as the most refined hotel in Sopot - the Kasino Hotel. As the Sofitel Grand Hotel, it is located at the seaside of the Gdansk Bay, in the heart of the town and next to the beach. Sofitel Grand Hotel has been totally refurbished during the last years, the classical atmosphere from the earlier period is still present and the hotel is now both classical, and modern. In 2007 it was decided to open Grand Spa by Algotherm, this to maintain the history of Sopot as a Spa resort.

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    Founded: 1924-1927
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    Rating

    4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Piotr Mizerek (15 months ago)
    Byliśmy tylko w restauracji, więc nie wiem jak hotelewe łóżka. Obsługa sprawia, że czujesz się doskonale, wszyscy są mili i uśmiechnięci. Na ścianie w jednym z pokojów można znaleźć zdjęcia słynnych gości, robi wrażenie. Jedzenie na piątkę, pięknie podane, przepyszne smaki oraz pomocny kelner. Ceny nie są niedostępne a widok na morze i molo tylko dodaje animuszu. Moje prosciutto z dzika rozłożyło mnie na łopatki. Polecam hotel jako atrakcje i restauracje dla doznań kulinarnych
    Franziska Juch (15 months ago)
    Terrific breakfast buffet and excellent staff. Way beyond average.
    Henrik Larsson (2 years ago)
    Great hotel. Nice staff, god breakfast.
    Andrzej Kleeberg (2 years ago)
    We had a great weekend stay with my family. Our room was nicely personalised, including bespoke wine label :) Kids had their own animals made of towels! On top of that my wife had birthday which we didn't mention during reservation and she was totally surprised by concierge Adam who prepared flowers and mini birthday cake. Once again thank you for great service and memorable stay!
    Joachim Bersaas Johansen (2 years ago)
    Nice hotel with big rooms. Try to get a room with sea view! Historic and good service from the staff. Recommended
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