The 16th-century Renaissance building was once home to the office of the Polish astronomer and city councillor Johann Hevelius, whose statue can be found in the park in front of the building. The former headquarters of the Council of Gdansk, the Old Town Hall served as the headquarters of the Soviet Army during the dying days of WWII, probably because it was practically the only building left standing in the city at the time. Today the building is open to the public and has become the focus of much creativity. There's also a cellar restaurant, and a good bookshop on the ground floor.

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Address

Bielańska 5, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1517
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

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User Reviews

Михайло Чаус (5 months ago)
Yaroslav Leonov (15 months ago)
Старая ратуша конца XVI века в Гданьске в Старом городе построена в стиле голландского маньеризма. Ратушу , как и многое в Гданьске строили голландские архитекторы. Сейчас тут располагается культурный центр. Рядом с ратушей мост на историческом канале Радуния - исторический Хлебный мост.
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Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.