Ragnhildsholmen

Kungälv, Sweden

Ragnhildsholmen was a medieval castle built by Håkon Håkonsson (Haakon IV) of Norway around the year 1250. The castle was first time mentioned in 1275. In 1304 it was donated to duke Erik in 1304 and saw the power struggle between Swedish Kings Birger and Magnus III. After the near Bohus Fortress completed, Ragnhildsholmen lost its purpose. It was demolished and stones were probably used to build Bohus. Today impressive ruins still stands on the site.

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Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.historvius.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MM TM (6 months ago)
A pretty Sight with Signs that you can call for information about it. Worth it if you just want a short interesting walk.
Mike Wyatt (8 months ago)
Very interesting history and site.
paul ballard (2 years ago)
Cool place
averno schaller (2 years ago)
It's a great ruin to visit. There is not so much left but with help of signs and maps you can recreate the history in your own head. It's also a beautiful view over Nordre älv.
James Gale (4 years ago)
A splendid ruin, great location, unspoilt, with stunning views of Nordre älv and the surrounding country. Definitely worth a visit.
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