Ragnhildsholmen

Kungälv, Sweden

Ragnhildsholmen was a medieval castle built by Håkon Håkonsson (Haakon IV) of Norway around the year 1250. The castle was first time mentioned in 1275. In 1304 it was donated to duke Erik in 1304 and saw the power struggle between Swedish Kings Birger and Magnus III. After the near Bohus Fortress completed, Ragnhildsholmen lost its purpose. It was demolished and stones were probably used to build Bohus. Today impressive ruins still stands on the site.

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Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.historvius.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Waleed Al-Farawi (6 months ago)
I love it but it is dangerous taking children there because the passage has electric fence and you need to hold tight your child so they do not run around
Endisa Imamovic (15 months ago)
Really nice historial place with beautiful scenery. Only thing to think about in summer time, the road that leads up to the ruins is in between high grass.
Endisa Imamovic (15 months ago)
Really nice historial place with beautiful scenery. Only thing to think about in summer time, the road that leads up to the ruins is in between high grass.
John Eriksson (17 months ago)
Free to visit, open 24/7 and cool to look at. Go here and look at some history.
John Eriksson (17 months ago)
Free to visit, open 24/7 and cool to look at. Go here and look at some history.
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