Church of Our Lady

Copenhagen, Denmark

The Church of Our Lady (Vor Frue Kirke) is the cathedral of Copenhagen and the National Cathedral of Denmark. The present day version of the church was designed by the architect Christian Frederik Hansen in the neoclassical style and was completed in 1829.

There has been several several churches on this site since 1209. The cathedral has been rebuilt four times: The first church was burnt down and reconstructed in 1316. The second church was razed by a great fire in 1728 together with five other churches in Copenhagen and rebuilt in 1738. Finally during the bombardment of Copenhagen in 1807 the spire was hit by a Congreve rocket and nearly burnt the church down to the ground.

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Founded: 1817-1829
Category: Religious sites in Denmark

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sebnem Sözer (2 years ago)
Quite peaceful church with remarkable Thorvaldsen's sculptures.
Filip Šulík (2 years ago)
Interesting history of the place. Such a light filled free space, doesn't feel like church. Loved it.
A K (3 years ago)
Something’s different about this church. Very peaceful. I recommend it as a place to just sit for a while.
John Nettleton (3 years ago)
Went to two concerts here, there are two pipe organs and an excellent choir. Add in the wonderful architecture and sculpture and you have a magnificent experience!
Erin Martin (3 years ago)
Most beautiful church i ever visited in Denmark,lovely!
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