National Gallery of Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

Statens Museum for Kunst ('Statens Museum' or sometimes 'National Gallery of Denmark') collects, registers, maintains, researches in and handles Danish and foreign art dating from the 14th century till the present day, mostly with their origins in western culture circles. The museum's collections constitute almost 9,000 paintings and sculptures, approximately 300,000 works of art on paper as well as more than 2,600 plaster casts of figures from ancient times, the middle-ages and the Renaissance.

The collections of the Danish National Gallery originates in the Art Chamber of the Danish monarchs. When the German Gerhard Morell became Keeper of Frederick V's Art Chamber about 1750, he suggested that the king create a separate collection of paintings. To ensure that the collection was not inferior to those of other European royal houses and local counts, the king made large-scale purchases of Italian, Netherlandish and German paintings. The collection became particularly well provided with Flemish and Dutch art. The most important purchase during Morell's term as keeper was Christ as the Suffering Redeemer by Andrea Mantegna.

Since then a great variety of purchases have been made. During the 19th century the works were almost exclusively by Danish artists, and for this reason the Museum has an unrivalled collection of paintings from the so-called Danish Golden Age. That the country was able to produce pictures of high artistic quality was something new, and a consequence of the establishment of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 1754.

More recently, the collection has been influenced by generous donations and long-term loans. In 1928 Johannes Rump's large collection of early French Modernist paintings was donated to the Museum. This was followed by purchases of paintings and sculpture in the French tradition.

The museum building was designed by Vilhelm Dahlerup and G.E.W. Møller and built 1889–1896 in a Historicist Italian Renaissance revival style.

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Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pinar Skriver (2 months ago)
The museum has 3 permanent sections. Mostly oil paintings. Europe 1400-1800, Danish and Nordic art, French collection. Danish and Nordic gallery is ideal to examine the cultural and social structural transformation regarding the changes that took place between 1800-mid1900 area. French collection is a small.collection but is significant with some of picasso's and mattise' pieces.
Anna Roitman (2 months ago)
A beautiful building that stores Danish art heritage both classical and modern
Penny (4 months ago)
A perfect mix of art from pre and post 1900. They actually made the permanent collections more interesting by inserting snippets of information about how different pandemics have affected the world and how they were depicted in these pantings. Nice job!
Sebastián Roblero Arellano (4 months ago)
Nice gallery and awesome Kafeteria.
Linus G. (5 months ago)
I really enjoyed spending some time here! We needed 2 hours to take a look at everything (not in detail tho). The price is reasonable for the amount of art and the overall look of the building.
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