National Gallery of Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

Statens Museum for Kunst ('Statens Museum' or sometimes 'National Gallery of Denmark') collects, registers, maintains, researches in and handles Danish and foreign art dating from the 14th century till the present day, mostly with their origins in western culture circles. The museum's collections constitute almost 9,000 paintings and sculptures, approximately 300,000 works of art on paper as well as more than 2,600 plaster casts of figures from ancient times, the middle-ages and the Renaissance.

The collections of the Danish National Gallery originates in the Art Chamber of the Danish monarchs. When the German Gerhard Morell became Keeper of Frederick V's Art Chamber about 1750, he suggested that the king create a separate collection of paintings. To ensure that the collection was not inferior to those of other European royal houses and local counts, the king made large-scale purchases of Italian, Netherlandish and German paintings. The collection became particularly well provided with Flemish and Dutch art. The most important purchase during Morell's term as keeper was Christ as the Suffering Redeemer by Andrea Mantegna.

Since then a great variety of purchases have been made. During the 19th century the works were almost exclusively by Danish artists, and for this reason the Museum has an unrivalled collection of paintings from the so-called Danish Golden Age. That the country was able to produce pictures of high artistic quality was something new, and a consequence of the establishment of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 1754.

More recently, the collection has been influenced by generous donations and long-term loans. In 1928 Johannes Rump's large collection of early French Modernist paintings was donated to the Museum. This was followed by purchases of paintings and sculpture in the French tradition.

The museum building was designed by Vilhelm Dahlerup and G.E.W. Møller and built 1889–1896 in a Historicist Italian Renaissance revival style.

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Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Xin Yi Yap (4 months ago)
Very nice selection of postcards, amazing interiors that are aesthetic and grand-looking, helpful staff and many art things to look at. Spent 2 hours (rushed through some exhibits) and felt like I could have stayed 2 more. They have the biggest matisse collection outside France.
Jorge Luna (5 months ago)
Amazing museum, I was pleasantly surprised by this museum, especially the distribution of the large collection of paintings in chronological order, which allows you to travel through time from the 14th century to the present day. I enjoyed the journey through history, interesting the large number of Danish and Nordic paintings, as well as the good collection of Dutch paintings. I was pleasantly surprised by the small Matisse collection. It takes at least two days to enjoy all the works on display.
beatrice (6 months ago)
Danish National Art Museum, I loved the visit. Not only to see the masterpieces and review the collection but also because of the curatorial aspects. It is a pleasure. Very thoroughly presented to the visitors.
Qinglu Wu (6 months ago)
It’s really big and definitely worth the price. Here I saw works in many different art styles. Staffs are really nice, and souvenirs are in reasonable prices.
Tim (7 months ago)
Wide ranging exhibitions of art, both from the Danish as well as other artists all over the world. Exhibitions are very well put together and flow nicely even if you deviate from the chronological layout they could be followed in. The variety of art (from paintings to sculptures and (hyper) modern performance art) is also splendid and it is always good (if not always nice) to see a museum choose to display art that is very confrontational and can be actually upsetting.
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