National Gallery of Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

Statens Museum for Kunst ('Statens Museum' or sometimes 'National Gallery of Denmark') collects, registers, maintains, researches in and handles Danish and foreign art dating from the 14th century till the present day, mostly with their origins in western culture circles. The museum's collections constitute almost 9,000 paintings and sculptures, approximately 300,000 works of art on paper as well as more than 2,600 plaster casts of figures from ancient times, the middle-ages and the Renaissance.

The collections of the Danish National Gallery originates in the Art Chamber of the Danish monarchs. When the German Gerhard Morell became Keeper of Frederick V's Art Chamber about 1750, he suggested that the king create a separate collection of paintings. To ensure that the collection was not inferior to those of other European royal houses and local counts, the king made large-scale purchases of Italian, Netherlandish and German paintings. The collection became particularly well provided with Flemish and Dutch art. The most important purchase during Morell's term as keeper was Christ as the Suffering Redeemer by Andrea Mantegna.

Since then a great variety of purchases have been made. During the 19th century the works were almost exclusively by Danish artists, and for this reason the Museum has an unrivalled collection of paintings from the so-called Danish Golden Age. That the country was able to produce pictures of high artistic quality was something new, and a consequence of the establishment of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 1754.

More recently, the collection has been influenced by generous donations and long-term loans. In 1928 Johannes Rump's large collection of early French Modernist paintings was donated to the Museum. This was followed by purchases of paintings and sculpture in the French tradition.

The museum building was designed by Vilhelm Dahlerup and G.E.W. Møller and built 1889–1896 in a Historicist Italian Renaissance revival style.

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Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Phillip Kristensen (21 months ago)
Beautiful architecture. Old meets new in very successful blend. Several interesting collections displayed in beautiful surroundings. Special events and workshops are available on a regular basis. Tourist information available at reception desk as well a souvenir and bookshop. Transport to and from is extremely easy and convenient. One can easily spend an entire day experiencing all corners of the museum. Furthermore, a ticket including 5 other museums, including Rosenborg Castle and the botanical garden, is available at a very favorable price. Excellent museum.
Peter Fabian (21 months ago)
Very nice place. Not free anymore. Art & cafe & nice park around.
Frieder Solaro (2 years ago)
The atmosphere is wonderful but the museum does not have a great selection of art. The modern section is either very abstract or too small. Older art they have a lot and a really good selection of tho.
Joyce Tang (2 years ago)
The museum proudly shows off work by Danish artists, but also has showcases works of art from other European countries, Nordic art and International contemporary art. If you are particularly keen on the Danish 'Golden Age' you will really love this museum and what it has to show. Despite how pleasant it was to walk through this museum (even with the school groups coming through), the majority of museum content did not really resonate with me - I put this down to personal favourite art movements, or not knowing enough to appreciate. My favourite section was probably the French Art collection, with a nice little collection from Matisse and Braq. If you're serious about getting a proper look at all the paintings and art in display at this national gallery, you could easily spend a whole day here. Even an appreciative glance will take a good 3 hours.
Amado Carino (2 years ago)
Massive collection of old Masters and contemporary art from Rembrandt, Tiepolo, Rubens to Picasso, Munch and Modigliani. The building itself is well-structured and located in a central location closely situated to several points of interest. This is a must for every arts enthusiast as most of the works here don't usually travel so this is the only place one can see and appreciate these treasures. A day pass for both the museum and the castle across the street can be purchased for a better deal compared to purchasing these separately. Take the hop-on-hop-off trolley for convenience.
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