Bjernede Church

Sorø, Denmark

Bjernede Church is one of only eight round churches in Denmark and the only one of its kind on the island of Zealand. The present church was built in circa 1170 by Sune Ebbesen from the influential Hvide family who belonged to the circle around King Valdemar II. His father, Ebbe Skjalmsen, the uncle of Bishop Absalon, had previously built a wooden church at the site. The tower of Sune Ebbesen's round church contains a room which the Hvide family used as an assemblage hall.

The lower part of the church stands in granite while the upper part is made of brick, a relatively new material at the time which had only been used in Denmark since the 1140s. The inspiration for the design most likely came from Schlamersdorf Church in Wagria which Sune Ebbesen had visited several times as a military commander. Bjernede Church, Horne Church in Jutland and Thorsager Church on Funen are all built to the same floor plan as that of Schlamersdorf Church. Four interior granite columns support the roof structure. Theporch was built in about 1500 and the tower had previously been altered but was, between 1890 and 1892, changed back to its original design by Hermann Baagøe Storck.

Storck was later heavily criticized for his restoration work. Peder Vilhelm Jensen-Klint and Ivar Bentsen later made church projects which resembled Bjernede prior to Storck's intervention, when it had a Bishop's Hat-like roof. Storck's restoration came to mark a turning point in Danish restoration architecture which from then on applied a more sensitive approach to the restoration of historical buildings.

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Details

Founded: c. 1170
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rebekka D. G. Hansen (7 months ago)
One of the few round churches on Zealand. Incredibly beautiful and worth a visit
Kenneth Bille (8 months ago)
Sending and different church. Memories of round churches and knights ... from the early Danish Middle Ages .. I was there out of season, was locked in anyway ...
Herr LariFary (13 months ago)
That was a amazing round church with a beautiful view. Its not that big but its historical inventory and the most beautiful graveyard ive actually ever seen. The view from the new Tower is amazing if you open the wood windows and you have a toilet like at every danish church.
Christopher Sødring Carlsen (3 years ago)
Fantastisk historie om stedet
Niels Jensen (3 years ago)
Sjællands eneste rundkirke er absolut et besøg vær. Husk også en tur op på loftet med en fantastisk udsigt - husk at slukke lyset. Udforsk også akustikken i den runde kirkesal. Den er fantastisk. Du kan høre præsten, men ikke se vedkommende.
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