Hørsholm Church

Hørsholm, Denmark

Hørsholm Church is located to the site of demolished Hirschholm Palace (also known as Hørsholm Palace), a former royal palace. The palace was rebuilt in the Baroque style in the 1740s and, one of the finest buildings of its time, it became known as the 'Versailles of the North'. It developed a notorious reputation in connection with its role in the affair between Johann Friedrich Struensee and Queen Caroline Mathilda in the 1770s. After that it fell into despair and was demolished in 1809-13. The palace was designed by Lauritz de Thurah for King Christian VI and his consort Queen Sophie Magdalene, and was intended as their summer residence.

In 1822-23 a small church designed by architect Christian Frederik Hansen was built on the grounds of the demolished palace. The park surrounding the church, which is located on a small island in a lake, still bears some evidence of the original palace garden. A number of the farm buildings Louise had built in the early 18th century still exist. Some of them house the Danish Museum of Hunting and Forestry. The Hørsholm Local Museum has a permanent exhibit about the palace, the royal affair and its consequences.

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Details

Founded: 1882-1883
Category: Religious sites in Denmark

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

S&J Funding (2 years ago)
Lidt interessant
Carsten Wiberg (2 years ago)
Fredfyldt sted i Hørsholm.
Kathrine Friis (4 years ago)
Beautiful nature walk around the church. Paths and forest around the lake. Great for walking your dog or collecting chestnuts with the kids.
Andreas Hedberg (5 years ago)
Beautiful church especially on a sunny day. If you are visiting Horsholm then this is a must see.
Birgit ball (5 years ago)
Beautiful church and surroundings. Horsholm my Farfar's and FaRmor's home. Thank you for letting me see it!
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