In the 17th century, Copenhagen had become home to a sizeable garrison. A military church was built at Kastellet in 1670 but its modest size only allowed it to serve the personnel at the fortress. The rest of the troops in the city had to use Church of Holmen, a former anchor forge which had been converted into a naval church in 1619.

When Sophie Amalienborg burned down in 1689, its chapel survived the flames and was subsequently put at the disposal of the Army. However, the small building which had been built for members of the royal court only served as a temporary solution. Christian V therefore provided a tract of land at Dronningens Tværgade for the construction of a new church for the Army and military engineer Georg Philip Müller completed a set of renderings in 1697. When Frederick IV ascended the throne in 1699, he moved the project to a site in the southernmost section of Sophie Amalienborg's former gardens. Construction began in 1703, still to Müller's design but under the supervision of Domenico Pelli. The following year it was decided to built the church to a larger and somewhat modified design and the project was taken over by General Master Builder Wilhelm Friedrich von Platen. The church was inaugurated on 24 March 1706.

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Details

Founded: 1703-1706
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MortenCopenhagen (2 years ago)
Beautiful and large church room with nice acoustics at concerts.
Dan Leonhardt (3 years ago)
Delightful space. Been here for several musical performances. Good acoustics and a nice organ as well. Benches in the balconies, and even those on the ground floor, are pretty solid (hard). Think about a cushion for back or butt.
Thomas Skjold (3 years ago)
Beautiful church, centrally located
Cecilie Viola Jarving (4 years ago)
Smukkeste kirke
Ib Møller Nielsen (4 years ago)
Flot
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