The Sagalund Museum

Kemiönsaari, Finland

The Sagalund Museum is one of the oldest and largest open-air museums in Finland. It consists of 26 historically valuable buildings with about 70 authentic room interiors. Among them are a courthouse from the 18th century and an old school from1649. There’s also a library with e.g. studies of Linné.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: ca. 1900
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.museot.fi
www.sagalund.fi

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Janne Laakio (10 months ago)
Mahtava lounas ,hieno paiķka
roger stark (10 months ago)
God lunch, intressant utbud av varor. Lönar sig att bekanta sig med och besöka utställningar och happenings.
Pentti Vähätalo (12 months ago)
Tässä kauniissa, nykypäivää vahvasti elävässä, menneen ajan miljöössä aika pysähtyy. Ja mikä ihana, täysi lounas alkuruokakeittoineen, salaatteineen, lämpimineruokineen ja efterräätteineen.
Luise_Erpenbeck (2 years ago)
A paradise for children (and their parents) - and incredibly nice staff! We spent the day at Sagalund today with our two younger children and were completely overwhelmed with everything the place had to offer. We stopped by more or less accidentally and did not expect to find such a huge place with so much to offer. We paid 7 Euros per adult (children are free) and were immediately offered a free guided tour of the whole area. While waiting for the tour we played in the little children's barn, filled with the most lovely toys (a puppet theater and lots of dress-up costumes, just to name a few) and in the children's hospital in the 1st floor of the main building. We were amazed at all the detail that had been put into the decoration, the costumes etc. Everything was arranged in such a loving and thoughtful way! For example, there were about 5 nurses/doctors costumes for children, in a somewhat antique style, which our children just loved, plus lots of genuinely old utensils such as an antique extendable children's bed, an old scale etc. all of which the children were free to play with. Our guide was about 15 min late, which was absolutely no problem because the children were completely happy playing. However, when the tour was over, both children got a present from the shop as compensation for the delay, even when we insisted this was absolutely not necessary! The tour, by the way, was very good, even though the woman who gave it was not an experienced guide. I totally recommend taking a tour because some of the houses (the old school!) are locked otherwise. The buildings are wonderful. You get to visit two schools from different eras, several authentic houses from 1920 and the 1960s, a barn and, the highlight to the children, a tiny pavilion with toys for children. All lovingly assembled with many antique toys the children can play with, with apparently no fear of anything getting stolen or broken. My husband and I had a lovely time relaxing on the beautiful meadow underneath the apple trees while the children were exploring the barn. We also had lunch at Café Adele and liked it very much. There is a little buffet with one dish of the day (very tasty!), salad, rice, potatoes, bread etc. Also coffee and good cookies. All for 9 Euros per adult, 6,50 Euros per child. Many locals ate there or had coffee, which we took as a good sign. Lastly, the museum shop offers a ton of quaint and lovely toys for children and little souvenirs which are hard to find elsewhere. All in all, a wonderful place, well worth a days visit!
Mike Heath (3 years ago)
A very enjoyable indoor and outdoor museum. Amazingly few visitors on the day we visited. It would help with a bit more English.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hochosterwitz Castle

Hochosterwitz Castle is considered to be one of Austria's most impressive medieval castles. The rock castle is one of the state's landmarks and a major tourist attraction.

The site was first mentioned in an 860 deed issued by King Louis the German of East Francia, donating several of his properties in the former Principality of Carantania to the Archdiocese of Salzburg. In the 11th century Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg ceded the castle to the Dukes of Carinthia from the noble House of Sponheim in return for their support during the Investiture Controversy. The Sponheim dukes bestowed the fiefdom upon the family of Osterwitz, who held the hereditary office of the cup-bearer in 1209.

In the 15th century, the last Carinthian cup-bearer, Georg of Osterwitz was captured in a Turkish invasion and died in 1476 in prison without leaving descendants. So after four centuries, on 30 May 1478, the possession of the castle reverted to Emperor Frederick III of Habsburg.

Over the next 30 years, the castle was badly damaged by numerous Turkish campaigns. On 5 October 1509, Emperor Maximilian I handed the castle as a pledge to Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg, then Bishop of Gurk. Bishop Lang undertook a substantial renovation project for the damaged castle.

About 1541, German king Ferdinand I of Habsburg bestowed Hochosterwitz upon the Carinthian governor Christof Khevenhüller. In 1571, Baron George Khevenhüller acquired the citadel by purchase. He fortified to deal with the threat of Turkish invasions of the region, building an armory and 14 gates between 1570 and 1586. Such massive fortification is considered unique in citadel construction.

Since the 16th century, no major changes have been made to Hochosterwitz. It has also remained in the possession of the Khevenhüller family as requested by the original builder, George Khevenhüller. A marble plaque dating from 1576 in the castle yard documents this request.

A specific feature is the access way to the castle passing through a total of 14 gates, which are particularly prominent owing to the castle's situation in the landscape. Tourists are allowed to walk the 620-metre long pathway through the gates up to the castle; each gate has a diagram of the defense mechanism used to seal that particular gate. The castle rooms hold a collection of prehistoric artifacts, paintings, weapons, and armor, including one set of armor 2.4 metres tall, once worn by Burghauptmann Schenk.