The Sagalund Museum

Kemiönsaari, Finland

The Sagalund Museum is one of the oldest and largest open-air museums in Finland. It consists of 26 historically valuable buildings with about 70 authentic room interiors. Among them are a courthouse from the 18th century and an old school from1649. There’s also a library with e.g. studies of Linné.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: ca. 1900
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

sagalund.fi
www.museot.fi

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Janne Laakio (2 years ago)
Mahtava lounas ,hieno paiķka
roger stark (2 years ago)
God lunch, intressant utbud av varor. Lönar sig att bekanta sig med och besöka utställningar och happenings.
Pentti Vähätalo (2 years ago)
Tässä kauniissa, nykypäivää vahvasti elävässä, menneen ajan miljöössä aika pysähtyy. Ja mikä ihana, täysi lounas alkuruokakeittoineen, salaatteineen, lämpimineruokineen ja efterräätteineen.
Luise_Erpenbeck (3 years ago)
A paradise for children (and their parents) - and incredibly nice staff! We spent the day at Sagalund today with our two younger children and were completely overwhelmed with everything the place had to offer. We stopped by more or less accidentally and did not expect to find such a huge place with so much to offer. We paid 7 Euros per adult (children are free) and were immediately offered a free guided tour of the whole area. While waiting for the tour we played in the little children's barn, filled with the most lovely toys (a puppet theater and lots of dress-up costumes, just to name a few) and in the children's hospital in the 1st floor of the main building. We were amazed at all the detail that had been put into the decoration, the costumes etc. Everything was arranged in such a loving and thoughtful way! For example, there were about 5 nurses/doctors costumes for children, in a somewhat antique style, which our children just loved, plus lots of genuinely old utensils such as an antique extendable children's bed, an old scale etc. all of which the children were free to play with. Our guide was about 15 min late, which was absolutely no problem because the children were completely happy playing. However, when the tour was over, both children got a present from the shop as compensation for the delay, even when we insisted this was absolutely not necessary! The tour, by the way, was very good, even though the woman who gave it was not an experienced guide. I totally recommend taking a tour because some of the houses (the old school!) are locked otherwise. The buildings are wonderful. You get to visit two schools from different eras, several authentic houses from 1920 and the 1960s, a barn and, the highlight to the children, a tiny pavilion with toys for children. All lovingly assembled with many antique toys the children can play with, with apparently no fear of anything getting stolen or broken. My husband and I had a lovely time relaxing on the beautiful meadow underneath the apple trees while the children were exploring the barn. We also had lunch at Café Adele and liked it very much. There is a little buffet with one dish of the day (very tasty!), salad, rice, potatoes, bread etc. Also coffee and good cookies. All for 9 Euros per adult, 6,50 Euros per child. Many locals ate there or had coffee, which we took as a good sign. Lastly, the museum shop offers a ton of quaint and lovely toys for children and little souvenirs which are hard to find elsewhere. All in all, a wonderful place, well worth a days visit!
Mike Heath (4 years ago)
A very enjoyable indoor and outdoor museum. Amazingly few visitors on the day we visited. It would help with a bit more English.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.