St. Mary's Church

Sigtuna, Sweden

St. Mary's Church (Mariakyrkan) is the oldest still used building in Sigtuna. The brick-made church was constructed in the mid-13th century and inaugurated in 1247. It was, however, completed probably in 1255, when the archbishop Jarler was buried there. The church was enlarged and sacristy added in the 1280’s. Due the Reformation King Gustav Vasa ordered to demolish the adjacent abbey in 1530 and St. Mary's became a parish church.

The full restoration was made in the 1640’s and the present was added then. Mural paintings were restored between 1904-1905. There are couple medieval artifacts remaining in the church, like fonts, a triumph crucifix and small altarpiece.

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Details

Founded: 1230-1255
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.karenbrown.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Göran Daniel Eriksson (3 years ago)
OK for a church I guess. If you've got 15 minutes to spare while in Sigtuna have a look and check out the ruins.
Andreas Karlsson Rosenblad (3 years ago)
Nice old church!
Adelė Žilinskaitė (3 years ago)
Beautiful old building. Exterior is more interesting though.
Michael Ellis (4 years ago)
Beautiful and tranquil
Vasant Padhiyar (5 years ago)
Sigtuna has an important place in Sweden's early history. It is the oldest town in Sweden, having been founded in 980.
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