St. Peter's Church Ruins

Sigtuna, Sweden

St. Peter's Church have been probably built in two phases during the 12th century.The eastern part with chancel, transept and central tower were erected first during the late 1100's, while the nave and the present west tower were added later.

According the tradition the church was used as a bishop’s cathedral until 1130 when the bishop's seat was moved to Gamla Uppsala. The another legend believes the church has been a royal church. After a fire in the 1600s, the church has stood as a ruin.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sebastian D'Agostino (8 months ago)
Interesting ruins surrounded a cementery that makes it the creepiest from the 3 ruins of Sigtuna.
I B (12 months ago)
I love old ruins !! This is very well preserved and well worth a look. It is very beautiful as well and such an interesting spot.
Shahzad Ansari (2 years ago)
The ruins of St. Olof's Church are located right in front of the Sigtuna beach. And there is a parking lot next to the premises of the ruins. Passing through the cemetery and St. Mary's Church, we reached the back side of the ruins. This ancient ruin is spectacular and well worth visiting. Because of its excellent preservation, you can now independently explore the ruin. There are informative signs at the ruin that provide more information about the church.
Litta S (4 years ago)
It is beautiful but we could not visit the church because they closed it before the closing time; because the caretaker had to go to some place :(
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